DORCHEAT HISTORICAL

                       MUSEUM

                       Submitted by Ann Mays Harlan

                                                                                      & Schelley Brown

 

Basic Organization Information
DORCHEAT HISTORICAL ASSN & MUSEUM INC

Physical Address:
Minden, LA 71058 
EIN:
72-0750051
Ruling Year:
1974 

"Owner description: The Dorcheat Historical Association Museum is the culmination of a dream that began in the fall of 1974, our organization was formed to preserve the history of Webster Parish. The museum represents a timeline of our area. You will learn about famous citizens and see and hear many great stories of the area. This museum is top notch for a small town. You will be amazed at the quality. You don't want to miss it if you are in the area.  less “for her and DHAM knowledge:  1.  Sidney Cox went there in 1999-2000 and observed the tombstone and wrote the lyrics for his now famous song, Bonita and Bill Butler.  Their assertion that the stone was left there in the 70’s is inaccurate.  Mr. Cox was not born until c. 1966, his famous band did not form until the mid 80’s.  The assertion to Honorable State Representative to Honorable Buddy Caldwell is wrong as far as dates.  Far wrong in fact. The letter of Honorable State Representative had this inaccurate date of DHAM possession.  If the tombstone would have been recognized by the school people as a stolen tombstone, the authorities would have/should have been notified and the DHAM, started by Beth/Bob/Richard, would not be in possession of it. 2.  Is it commonplace for museums to have tombstones in a museum?  Especially tombstones that were stolen off of a grave?  I have been to museums all over the country and have never seen a tombstone. 3. Several members told me they wished a replica could be installed at Overton.  Since the grave now sits unmarked due to thievery, would that not be a good idea? 

I as well as others will contribute to the $500 cost of having it “built”. Thank YouTom Carey” (end of paragraph) 

Sherry Gritzbaugh pledged $100.00 Tom Carey pledged $100.00 Ed McCoy pledged $100.00.

Herman Ratcliff will donate $100 ----but only if the stone will be returned to Overton and the replica will be in the museum----    We now have $400.in pledges toward the Newman tombstone if the replica will be kept in the museum and the stone will be returned to Overton.    According to what I have learned it might take $500. for the replica and $400. more to get it up the hill.   Thank you all for your interest in the preservation of Overton Cemetery and Dr. Newman's tombstone being put back in his final resting place.  

Sherry

                                               

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Hunter\
The Dorcheat Museum will be offering a limited edition print of an original painting by folk artist Cora Lou Brown Robinson. This print will be an 11 x 14 for $25 plus $5.00 for shipping and handling. We will also offer a 20 x 24 canvas reproduction for $175. Don’t miss your opportunity to have a piece of 1950’s memories of Minden in your home.
Cora Lou Brown Robinson and Hunter’s Playhouse
 
  YOU’RE INVITED TO A RECEPTION HONORING JUANITA AGAN “THE CAMEO LADY” ON THE OCCASION OF HER 85th BIRTHDAY SATURDAY, JUNE 28, 2008 FROM 2 p.m. UNTILL 4 p.m. AT THE DORCHEAT HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION MUSEUM NO GIFTS PLEASE
 
  Posted by S

                                          Submitted by Schelley Brown

    The Bio Card will read as follows: Known  to most simply as “Cora Lou", this Minden native and resident is recognized for not only her talents as a professional folk artist but also as a teacher, wife, mother, grandmother and true product of a deep -rooted Minden family.  Born in 1935 to Ed and Celeste Brown, Cora Lou has two siblings--one brother, Ed Brown and one sister, Mary Celeste Powers.  Cora Lou is married to Ronald Robinson. They have three children and seven grandchildren. Her childhood was what she calls “picture perfect.".   She played from morning ’til night with the neighborhood children.  Their lives followed a pattern.  During the week, school and each Saturday morning they listened to “Let’s Pretend” on the radio and that afternoon would walk to the “picture show” and then walk safely home.  Each Sunday they went to Sunday school and then to church.  She remembers the thrill of chasing lightning bugs at dusk while all the neighborhood parents sat outside and visited on their front porch.  It was a simpler time in Minden, Louisiana, and for many of the people that grew up here. Her teenage years were wonderful in part due to the generosity of the Hunter family.  The Hunter family has owned the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Minden since 1901.  Back in the 1940’s the Hunters became the recreation hub for all of Minden and the surrounding area.  Everyone swam in their pool, played in their playground, danced in their playhouse, and watched countless ballgames in their park.  No other town has ever seen the likes of the Hunter family in Cora Lou’s eyes.  The 1940’s, 50’s and early 60’s were a special time in Minden, Louisiana because of the generosity of Gladys and Larry Hunter.  Cora Lou’s love of the special times and memories of the 1950’s and Hunter’s Playhouse is depicted in one of her first paintings of a dance at the Playhouse.    Cora Lou Brown Robinson says her paintings are about “God and Country, Family and Friends.”  Many of her ideas for her paintings come from her childhood and all come from her heart.  Her paintings have been featured all across the United States and no one appreciates her more than her hometown and what she does for them by creating their memories on canvas.    The following is taken from the “Memories of Hunter’s” book   Memories are precious, yet hard to express A golden moment, suspended in a capsule waiting to come again---but never will A safe haven in the storm of today A part of time so dear and so wondrous--one would have to have lived it to fully understand it A slice of life we wanted our children to experience--but they did not A time almost pure if compared to today’s lifestyles Something we can almost hold in our hands, yet not grasp A man and a woman so totally dedicated to young people that they made them their life Our own youth and innocence ---only a yesterday away                                                                                            ------Cora Lou Robinson   This project to benefit the Dorcheat Historical Association Museum is sponsored so far by Easley’s Fine Arts, Gibsland Bank and Trust, and one other individual.

 

We have two great nights planned one is June 9th the other is July 14th for our "Night For The Museum Events".  These are held at Christopher's on Main Street right around the corner from the Museum. You can visit the blog at www.museuminminden.blogspot.com for all the latest museum information.  Museum opens Tuesday June 10th, 2008!   June 9th, 2008 “A Night For The Museum” With a Member of the “Greatest Generation” Mr. George Turner The June 9th, 2008 “Night for the Museum” will be a night to remember. Dorcheat Museum’s director; Schelley Brown, announces another special historic venue event. Monday, June 9th, 2008, Mr. George Turner another one of Minden’s longtime citizen’s will be the guest speaker at The Dorcheat Historical Association’s “Night for the Museum”. Don’t miss this exciting and entertaining evening of hearing our parish history as told by a 4th generation Minden resident. This informative night dealing with one of Webster parish’s pioneering families is sure to be well received by all those attending. It has been said about Mr. Turner, “He is a quite hero”. Ms. Brown exclaimed, “I am so excited about this event because these men and women that fought in World War II overcame incredible obstacles in battle, to return home to their families. Their stories need to be recorded and remembered for future generations. I think everyone will enjoy hearing the wonderful stories that Mr. Turner; (a Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster recipient) has to tell; not only about World War II but also his stories about his life in Minden and his knowledge of the forgotten community of Long Springs!”
Mark you calendars now and keep the second Monday of every month open for “Night for the Museum Historic Events”. These type events will eventually be held in the museum, when the area to be known as the “Children’s Learning Center” is completed. Museum coordinators are again expecting a large turnout, so you may want to bring your lawn chairs again just in case of a shortage of seating! The last three months performances by Mr. Frank Griffith, Marcus Wren and Webster Nation were both held to packed houses. These types of events are something the museum wants to offer on a regular basis as entertainment and a living history lesson. July’s event will feature Dr. Steve Kirkikis and an informative night dealing with the immigrant families that had such a huge and important influence on Webster Parish.
Mr. Turner will be speaking at Christopher’s located at 615 Main Street in Minden, Louisiana. Refreshments will be provided by Charlotte Martin and sponsored by Ty Pendergrass of Argent Financial. Refreshments will be served at 6:00 P.M. and an opening welcome from Mr. Thad Andress; President of the Dorcheat Historical Association & Museum, Inc. and introduction by Webster Parish historian; John Agan. Program will begin at 6:30 with a special gift basket to be given away to a lucky attendee at the end of the evening!
Museum director Schelley Brown stated, “With the help of Phil Demaline, these speaking engagements are being recorded so that we will have a digital record for the museum of all our local history. Our last three DVD’s featuring Mr. Griffith, Mr. Wren and Mr. Nation are still available for $10. Sound system will again be provided by Durwood Blake allowing everyone the opportunity to not miss a single word. A tour of the museum will be available to everyone following the program. This will give everyone the chance to see the museum just one day before its official opening on June 10th at 10 a.m. “Even though the museum is a long way from completion we are going to open so that people can appreciate what we are doing and where we are going with this project. It is always going to be a work in progress. A museum changes daily as people bring in artifacts and documents. For anyone that has taken a tour they know that this museum is so far beyond what people expect. It is going to be a huge asset to Webster Parish”, stated Ms. Brown.
Don’t miss your chance at hearing some exciting stories of Minden’s past from someone that remembers many important events and people that changed our community and are forever markers in time for Minden. Admission is free of charge and everyone is welcome. For more information on “A Night for the Museum with Mr. George Turner” please contact Schelley Brown at 318-423-0192 or visit
http://www.museuminminden.blogspot.com/ . Reservations not required first come first serve seating.     Press Release: For July 14th, 2008 Museum Event    “Night for the Museum” with a Dr. Steve Kirkikis “A Look at Minden’s International Branches”

The featured speaker at the Dorcheat Historical Museum was Dr.
Steve Kirkikis, Class of 1953.  The topic of tonight's program was "A Look
At Minden's International Branches."

Submitted by Ann Mays Harlan, Class of 1953

  The July 14th, 2008 “Night for the Museum” will be a night to remember.  Dorcheat Museum’s director; Schelley Brown, announces another special historic venue event.  Monday, July 14th, 2008, Dr. Steve Kirkikis one of Minden’s past citizens will be the guest speaker at The Dorcheat Historical Association’s “Night for the Museum”.  Don’t miss this exciting and entertaining evening of hearing our parish history as told by a member of one of the many immigrant families that had such a huge and important influence on Webster Parish.  This informative night dealing with Webster parish’s families that made it to Minden via Ellis Island is sure to be well received by all those attending.  Dr. Kirkikis’s parents were Gust A. Kirkikis, and Malamo Papanastas, of Greek ancestry whom came from Turkey to America and to Minden in the early 1920s following displacement by World War I.  They were married in Minden on October 25, 1925.  Ms. Brown exclaimed, “Ellis Island is a symbol of America’s immigrant heritage. It is hard to imagine, that in the time between 1892 -1954, nearly twelve million men, women and children landed there in their search of freedom of speech and religion, and for economic opportunity.  Imagine arriving on a huge ocean liner and seeing the Statue of Liberty and the New York sky line for the first time!  To see Minden and the United States through their eyes will be a different perspective of history for our parish.  These families changed our parish and brought a cultural flair to our area that didn’t exist until they arrived.  At the end of Dr. Kirkikis’s talk, several other invited guests such as; Tony Elzen and George Mourad and members of the Michael family will be asked to come forward and speak about their families experiences.”  A bronze plaque inside the Statue of Liberty speaks volumes, to those that take time to read its message.  It is a strong reminder of how fortunate we as Americans are to live in a free country.  The New Colossus Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"
Emma Lazarus, 1883
  The new museum members are glad that they are able to capture, this important aspect of our community.  These stories need to be recorded and remembered for future generations.  Everyone will enjoy hearing the wonderful cultural and inspirational stories that Dr. Kirkikis has to tell; about his life in Minden and his knowledge of the other families from faraway places that came to call Minden their home!     Mark you calendars now and keep the second Monday of every month open for “Night for the Museum Historic Events”.  These type events will eventually be held in the museum, when the area to be known as the “Children’s Learning Center” is completed.  Museum coordinators are again expecting a large turnout, so you may want to bring your lawn chairs again just in case of a shortage of seating!  The last four months performances by Mr. Frank Griffith, Marcus Wren, Webster Nation and George Turner were held to packed houses.  These types of events are something the museum wants to offer on a regular basis as entertainment and a living history lesson.  July’s event will be held at Christopher’s located at 615 Main Street in Minden, Louisiana.  Refreshments will be provided by Charlotte Martin and sponsored by Ty Pendergrass of Argent Financial.  Refreshments will be served at 6:00 P.M. and an opening welcome from Mr. Thad Andress; President of the Dorcheat Historical Association & Museum, Inc. and introduction by Webster Parish historian; John Agan.   Program will begin at 6:30 with a special gift basket with items from the Ellis Island Museum to be given away to a lucky attendee at the end of the evening! Museum director Schelley Brown stated, “With the help of Phil Demaline, these speaking engagements are being recorded so that we will have a digital record for the museum of all our local history.  Our last three DVD’s featuring Mr. Griffith, Mr. Wren and Mr. Nation are still available for $10.  Sound system will again be provided by Durwood Blake allowing everyone the opportunity to not miss a single word.  A tour of the museum will be available to everyone following the program.  This will give everyone the chance to see the museum just one day before its official opening on June 10th at 10 a.m.  “Even though the museum is a long way from completion we are going to open so that people can appreciate what we are doing and where we are going with this project.  It is always going to be a work in progress. A museum changes daily as people bring in artifacts and documents.  For anyone that has taken a tour they know that this museum is so far beyond what people expect.  It is going to be a huge asset to Webster Parish”, stated Ms. Brown.    Don’t miss your chance at hearing some exciting stories of Minden’s past from people that remember many important events and families that changed our community and are forever markers in time for Minden. Admission is free of charge and everyone is welcome.  For more information on “A Night for the Museum” please contact Schelley Brown at 318-423-0192 or visit www.museuminminden.blogspot.com .  Reservations not required first come first serve seating.     

                                                                 

  May 2008   All…..A Board….The L & A Railroad with Mr. Webster Nation for a Special “Night For The Museum” The May 12th, 2008 “Night for the Museum” will hold a special place in many hearts, especially those that have rail dust mixed with their blood.  Dorcheat Museum’s director; Schelley Brown, announces another special historic venue event.  Monday, May 12th, 2008, Mr. Webster Nation another one of Minden’s longtime citizen’s will be the guest speaker at The Dorcheat Historical Association’s “Night for the Museum”.  Don’t miss this exciting and entertaining night of hearing our parish history.  This informative night dealing with Webster parish railroading history during the 1940’s era should be another huge success.  It has been said about Mr. Nation, “When he talks of "railroading" his voice becomes animated, and then you understand the phrase - "romance of the rails". For 42 years he was the engineer on some of the most prestigious passenger trains, as well as engineer on many freight trains. Webster Nation should have finished high school in 1939, but he stayed over to play football the autumn of 1939, and graduated in January, 1940. He began his career with the L & A Railroad in 1941 and continued until his retirement in 1983. Ms. Brown exclaimed, “I am so excited about this event because the L & A Railroad was so important to our area and so many families in Minden were railroad families.  I think everyone will enjoy hearing the wonderful stories that Mr. Nation has to tell!”  The last two months performances by Mr. Frank Griffith and Marcus Wren were both held to packed houses.  These types of events are something the museum wants to offer on a regular basis as entertainment and a living history lesson.  These type events will eventually be held in the museum, when the area to be known as the “Children’s Learning Center” is completed.  Museum coordinators are again expecting a large turnout, so you may want to bring your lawn chairs again just in case of a shortage of seating! 

 

Another Large Turnout for "A Night for the Museum with Marcus Wren II"!
April is Confederate History month; in remembrance of this time in history Monday night at Christopher's on Main Street was the place to be! Nearly 200 people from as far away as Kansas turned out to hear Mr. Marcus Wren's narration of events that took place during the "War Between The States Era of Minden". The evening began with a greeting from Dorcheat Historical Association President Mr. Thad Andress. This was followed by a short opening speech from Dorcheat Museum director Schelley Brown. Ms. Brown stated, "That all wars are controversial but the need to remember those wars as a part of history so that the same mistakes are not made again is a museum's obligation. The Minden Blues played an important part in Minden's history and we don't want that history or any other to be forgotten."
Mr. Marcus Wren II has been a longtime businessman in our area and a thirty year member and supporter of the Dorcheat Historical Association & Museum. Mr. Wren spoke of his grandfather a civil war veteran! Mr. Wren's grandfather was George Lovic Pierce Wren (1836-1901) of the Minden Blues. During the War G.L.P. Wren fought with the Army of Northern Virginia in most of the important battles of the war, including Bull Run and Gettysburg. Twice captured, he spent time in the Union Prison Camp at Fort Delaware. After the war taught school in the Pine Grove area of Webster parish and would later become a Louisiana State Legislator and Senator. Mr. Wren concluded his talk with the legend of how the familiar tune of TAPS came to be. This story was followed by the sounds of the TAPS played by Mickey Love on trumpet.
Museum board members were pleased, that so many attended this 2nd of many such events that they have planned for the future. Future events were discussed with the subjects to include a 1950's themed event; black history in Webster Parish, Coca-Cola Company highlight, early baseball in our area, and North Webster Parish history are just some of what is in the works for the coming year.
Following Mr. Wren's program, Ms. Brown drew a name for a large gift basket that was donated by local merchants and friends of the Dorcheat Historical Association Museum. The winner was Mr. Rod Gann of Minden. After the drawing everyone was invited to please take a tour to see the new Dorcheat Historical Association and Museum, Inc.'s progress. Large groups were shown the progress that has taken place in the museum since November. The new exhibit cases that are currently being painted are very impressive and will be filled with items related to the Civil War, Reconstruction, Historic Homes, Hunters & Coca-Cola, 1933 Disasters, Sports, Education, Churches, Industry and Business leaders just to name a few. This museum will follow a time line from the Indian era to present day with help from Webster Parish historian John Agan.
Many locals were able to meet the visionary artist behind the museum; Mr. Larry Milford. Larry was on hand after the speaking program to show people the work that has been done and tell of his plans for the future. Dorcheat Historical Association President Mr. Thad Andress emphasized the fact that this project cost and will cost a lot of money and that without everyone contributing in one way or another that this project would not be possible. Pledge cards and volunteer sheets were handed out and everyone was encouraged to take part and have a part in "their" museum. "This is everyone's museum and it will take everyone to make it happen!" is the message museum board members want to convey to everyone.
 

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  A Night at the Museum with Mr. Frank Griffith Changing Locations Due To Overwhelming Response” Monday March 10th, 2008, Mr. Frank Griffith one of Minden’s longtime citizen’s will be the guest speaker at The Dorcheat Historical Association’s next meeting.  “This informative night dealing with Minden’s history was to be held at the new Dorcheat Historical Association Museum located at 116 Pearl Street in Minden, Louisiana, due to the overwhelming response we are now changing locations.  We are expecting a large turnout, with many calling to make reservations!  Mr. Griffith will now be speaking at Christopher’s located at 615 Main Street in Minden, Louisiana.  Same date and time just a new location.  With the help of Phil Demaline, this speaking engagement will be recorded so that we will have a digital record for the museum.  Refreshments will be served and a tour of the museum will follow for those that wish to see our progress”, stated Schelley Brown.  Don’t miss your chance at hearing some exciting stories of Minden’s past as told from someone that has an astounding memory for detail and historic facts.  Mr. Griffith brought tears to many eyes this year at the Minden Cemetery Ghost walk, when he portrayed his father B.F. Griffith Sr. long time Sherriff in Webster Parish between 1900-1908.  B.F. Griffith Sr. lived until he was into his 90’s in the 1960’s.  B.F. Griffith Sr. is also one of the founders of the Webster Parish Fair.  Griffith Stadium is named in his honor and is located on the spot where in the early 20th century Mr. Griffith had a horse racing track constructed.  Many said his portrayal of his father was like stepping back in time to another era.  Mr. Griffith’s style of narration is best described as “it was like he was right there”.  He remembers vivid details of events and people that changed our community and are forever markers in time for Minden. This night of stories will begin at 6:00 P.M. so you don’t want to be late.  A large crowd is expected with a question and answer period to follow if time allows.  Admission is free of charge and everyone is welcome.    “A Night at the Museum with Mr. Frank Griffith” Monday March 10th, 2008, Mr. Frank Griffith one of Minden’s longtime citizen’s will be the guest speaker at The Dorcheat Historical Association Museum’s next meeting.  This informative night dealing with Minden’s history will be held at the new Museum located at 116 Pearl Street in Minden, Louisiana.  Don’t miss this chance at hearing some exciting stories of Minden’s past as told from someone that has an astounding memory for detail and historic facts.  Mr. Griffith brought tears to many eyes this year at the Minden Cemetery Ghost walk, when he portrayed his father B.F. Griffith Sr. long time Sherriff in Webster Parish between 1900-1908.  B.F. Griffith Sr. lived until he was into his 90’s in the 1960’s.  B.F. Griffith Sr. is also one of the founders of the Webster Parish Fair.  Griffith Stadium is named in his honor and is located on the spot where in the early 20th century Mr. Griffith had a horse racing track constructed.  Many said his portrayal of his father was like stepping back in time to another era.  Mr. Griffith’s style of narration is best described as “it was like he was right there”.  He remembers vivid details of events and people that changed our community and are forever markers in time for Minden. This night of stories will begin at 6:00 P.M. so you don’t want to be late.  A large crowd is expected with a question and answer period to follow if time allows.  Admission is free of charge.    March 29th, 2008 Grave dedication for Civil War Soldiers Old Minden Cemetery   In the old section of the Minden Cemetery, in the back right corner marks the graves of over 20 unknown Civil War Confederate Soldiers.  This hallowed ground of 144 years has never been forgotten.  Even though the soldiers names may be lost forever to the future, their lives are remembered for their bravery and valor in April of 1864.  These men more than likely were from the Walker Texas Division and General Polinac's Division of Louisiana During the bloody and furious battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill these men were wounded and brought to Minden to be treated for their wounds.  Both of these divisions had been in Minden before, a few months earlier, they had wintered in or near Minden in 1864. These men had family and these men were loved just as the 100’s of soldiers that fought with the Minden Blue’s and other regiments from our area did.  Like so many Civil War soldiers many were lost and never heard from again.  They are somewhere across these United States buried in unmarked graves or left to scatter to the wind over 144 years ago.  Many a loved one would only hope that their dear departed would have been laid to rest with the respect that the long plot in the Minden Cemetery represents.  That is where this story really begins.  Over the years the names were lost if they were ever known of the soldiers in what has become known as the “Civil War Trench” it is estimated that somewhere between 20-30 bodies lie buried along this concrete line.  May 1, 1933, one of the worst tornados to ever hit Louisiana struck Minden causing a tremendous amount of damage to the cemetery.  A large monument belonging to the great inventor Samuel J. Webb was broken off.  This piece of stone was saved and later made in to what we have today as the “Trench” monument.  This stone was placed at the grave site by the Daughter’s of the Confederacy in May of 1936.  It reads “In Memory Of the Confederate Dead 1861-1864”  A few years ago, through genealogy research, one of these unnamed men would be identified by his family.  Thomas L. Anderson PVT  CO 1, 31 Texas Cavalry 1828-1864 was finally found by his family and given a grave marker to tell the world who he was.  Unfortunately the rest are still unknown but not forgotten.  In 2007 the T.M. Scott Camp of Minden’s Son’s of Confederate Veterans wanted to do something to honor these men.  The groups of men are direct descendants of Civil War Confederate Veterans.  They along with many other Civil War Camps across the country teach living history lessons in the forms of battle reenactments and encampments.  They also take on the cemeteries as projects; dedicating markers and helping descendents locate possible burial sites of unknown soldiers.  They are seen in parades and also have Civil War galas where you have the opportunity to step back in time and listen to authentic Civil War music, dress in hoop skirts and dance to the Virginia Reel. Barry Watson contacted Schelley Brown whom is a member of the Minden Cemetery Board several months ago with a request to erect markers for the unknown soldiers.  Brown stated, “Having worked with the Son’s of The Confederacy and the Daughter’s of the Confederacy on several occasion during the annual Minden Cemetery Ghost Walk, I was thrilled that they were taking this project under their wing.  I think this is a wonderful opportunity for the community to come together and remember these soldiers in a historic manner.” With the help of the Veteran’s Administration the forms were completed.  The 21 stones were delivered on a large pallet weighing over 5000 lbs., earlier this year.  Camp members from Minden, Claiborne Parish and El Dorado, Arkansas came together a few weeks later.  Those member included Robert Vance, Bobby White, Jeff Scarlett, Jeff Earl Scarlett, Gator McDade, Ethan Powell, Roger Pittman, Ronnie Sale, Crystal Vance and Barry Watson.  In one day of hard back-breaking work all the stones were put in place.  After 144 years these men finally have a head stone to show that they are there.  Saturday March 29th, 2008 at 1:00 PM a dedication ceremony will take place at the Minden Cemetery located on Bayou Avenue off Pine Street.  The public is invited to see this unique, living history lesson.  Sons of The Confederacy Camp members from El Dorado, Shreveport, Claiborne, Ruston, Farmerville and West Monroe are expected to participate in this long awaited event.  Civil War attire if at all possible but is not required to attend.  This will be a wonderful time to show children what history a cemetery holds and how important remembering the past is for our future.  

                  

 

With the help of the Veteran’s Administration the forms were completed.  The 21 stones were delivered on a large pallet weighing over 5000 lbs., earlier this year.  Camp members from Minden, Claiborne Parish and El Dorado, Arkansas came together a few weeks later.  Those member included Robert Vance, Bobby White, Jeff Scarlett, Jeff Earl Scarlett, Gator McDade, Ethan Powell, Roger Pittman, Ronnie Sale, Crystal Vance and Barry Watson.  In one day of hard back-breaking work all the stones were put in place.  After 144 years these men finally have a head stone to show that they are there.  Saturday March 29th, 2008 at 1:00 PM a dedication ceremony will take place at the Minden Cemetery located on Bayou Avenue off Pine Street.  The public is invited to see this unique, living history lesson.  Sons of The Confederacy Camp members from El Dorado, Shreveport, Claiborne, Ruston, Farmerville and West Monroe are expected to participate in this long awaited event.  Civil War attire if at all possible but is not required to attend.  This will be a wonderful time to show children what history a cemetery holds and how important remembering the past is for our future.

 

                  

                They had standing room only. Everyone enjoyed Joan's memories of the "Two Treebys."

                  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  In the old section of the Minden Cemetery, in the back right corner marks the graves of over 20 unknown Civil War Confederate Soldiers.  This hallowed ground of 144 years has never been forgotten.  Even though the soldiers names may be lost forever to the future, their lives are remembered for their bravery and valor in April of 1864.  These men more than likely were from the Walker Texas Division and General Polinac's Division of Louisiana.  During the bloody and furious battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill these men were wounded and brought to Minden to be treated for their wounds.  Both of these divisions had been in Minden before, a few months earlier, they had wintered in or near Minden in 1864. These men had family and these men were loved just as the 100’s of soldiers that fought with the Minden Blue’s and other regiments from our area did.  Like so many Civil War soldiers many were lost and never heard from again.  They are somewhere across these United States buried in unmarked graves or left to scatter to the wind over 144 years ago.  Many a loved one would only hope that their dear departed would have been laid to rest with the respect that the long plot in the Minden Cemetery represents.  That is where this story really begins.  Over the years the names were lost if they were ever known of the soldiers in what has become known as the “Civil War Trench” it is estimated that somewhere between 20-30 bodies lie buried along this concrete line.  May 1, 1933, one of the worst tornados to ever hit Louisiana struck Minden causing a tremendous amount of damage to the cemetery.  A large monument belonging to the great inventor Samuel J. Webb was broken off.  This piece of stone was saved and later made in to what we have today as the “Trench” monument.  This stone was placed at the grave site by the Daughter’s of the Confederacy in May of 1936.  It reads “In Memory Of the Confederate Dead 1861-1864”  A few years ago, through genealogy research, one of these unnamed men would be identified by his family.  Thomas L. Anderson PVT  CO 1, 31 Texas Cavalry 1828-1864 was finally found by his family and given a grave marker to tell the world who he was.  Unfortunately the rest are still unknown but not forgotten.  In 2007 the T.M. Scott Camp of Minden’s Son’s of Confederate Veterans wanted to do something to honor these men.  The groups of men are direct descendants of Civil War Confederate Veterans.  They along with many other Civil War Camps across the country teach living history lessons in the forms of battle reenactments and encampments.  They also take on the cemeteries as projects; dedicating markers and helping descendents locate possible burial sites of unknown soldiers.  They are seen in parades and also have Civil War galas where you have the opportunity to step back in time and listen to authentic Civil War music, dress in hoop skirts and dance to the Virginia Reel. Barry Watson contacted Schelley Brown whom is a member of the Minden Cemetery Board several months ago with a request to erect markers for the unknown soldiers.  Brown stated, “Having worked with the Son’s of The Confederacy and the Daughter’s of the Confederacy on several occasion during the annual Minden Cemetery Ghost Walk, I was thrilled that they were taking this project under their wing.  I think this is a wonderful opportunity for the community to come together and remember these soldiers in a historic manner.” With the help of the Veteran’s Administration the forms were completed.  The 21 stones were delivered on a large pallet weighing over 5000 lbs., earlier this year.  Camp members from Minden, Claiborne Parish and El Dorado, Arkansas came together a few weeks later.  Those member included Robert Vance, Bobby White, Jeff Scarlett, Jeff Earl Scarlett, Gator McDade, Ethan Powell, Roger Pittman, Ronnie Sale, Crystal Vance and Barry Watson.  In one day of hard back-breaking work all the stones were put in place.  After 144 years these men finally have a head stone to show that they are there.  Saturday March 29th, 2008 at 1:00 PM a dedication ceremony will take place at the Minden Cemetery located on Bayou Avenue off Pine Street.  The public is invited to see this unique, living history lesson.  Sons of The Confederacy Camp members from El Dorado, Shreveport, Claiborne, Ruston, Farmerville and West Monroe are expected to participate in this long awaited event.  Civil War attire if at all possible but is not required to attend.  This will be a wonderful time to show children what history a cemetery holds and how important remembering the past is for our future. For more information you can contact Barry Watson at 371-9757 or watsonautosvc@bellsouth.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Press release March 29th, 2008 Grave dedication for Civil War Soldiers Old Minden Cemetery   Remembering the Unknown Veterans 144 Years Later   In the old section of the Minden Cemetery, in the back right corner marks the graves of over 20 unknown Civil War Confederate Soldiers.  This hallowed ground of 144 years has never been forgotten.  Even though the soldiers names may be lost forever to the future, their lives are remembered for their bravery and valor in April of 1864.  These men more than likely were from the Walker Texas Division and General Polinac's Division of Louisiana.  During the bloody and furious battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill these men were wounded and brought to Minden to be treated for their wounds.  Both of these divisions had been in Minden before, a few months earlier, they had wintered in or near Minden in 1864. These men had family and these men were loved just as the 100’s of soldiers that fought with the Minden Blue’s and other regiments from our area did.  Like so many Civil War soldiers many were lost and never heard from again.  They are somewhere across these United States buried in unmarked graves or left to scatter to the wind over 144 years ago.  Many a loved one would only hope that their dear departed would have been laid to rest with the respect that the long plot in the Minden Cemetery represents.  That is where this story really begins.  Over the years the names were lost if they were ever known of the soldiers in what has become known as the “Civil War Trench” it is estimated that somewhere between 20-30 bodies lie buried along this concrete line.  May 1, 1933, one of the worst tornados to ever hit Louisiana struck Minden causing a tremendous amount of damage to the cemetery.  A large monument belonging to the great inventor Samuel J. Webb was broken off.  This piece of stone was saved and later made in to what we have today as the “Trench” monument.  This stone was placed at the grave site by the Daughter’s of the Confederacy in May of 1936.  It reads “In Memory Of the Confederate Dead 1861-1864”  A few years ago, through genealogy research, one of these unnamed men would be identified by his family.  Thomas L. Anderson PVT  CO 1, 31 Texas Cavalry 1828-1864 was finally found by his family and given a grave marker to tell the world who he was.  Unfortunately the rest are still unknown but not forgotten.  In 2007 the T.M. Scott Camp of Minden’s Son’s of Confederate Veterans wanted to do something to honor these men.  The groups of men are direct descendants of Civil War Confederate Veterans.  They along with many other Civil War Camps across the country teach living history lessons in the forms of battle reenactments and encampments.  They also take on the cemeteries as projects; dedicating markers and helping descendents locate possible burial sites of unknown soldiers.  They are seen in parades and also have Civil War galas where you have the opportunity to step back in time and listen to authentic Civil War music, dress in hoop skirts and dance to the Virginia Reel. Barry Watson contacted Schelley Brown whom is a member of the Minden Cemetery Board several months ago with a request to erect markers for the unknown soldiers.  Brown stated, “Having worked with the Son’s of The Confederacy and the Daughter’s of the Confederacy on several occasion during the annual Minden Cemetery Ghost Walk, I was thrilled that they were taking this project under their wing.  I think this is a wonderful opportunity for the community to come together and remember these soldiers in a historic manner.” With the help of the Veteran’s Administration the forms were completed.  The 21 stones were delivered on a large pallet weighing over 5000 lbs., earlier this year.  Camp members from Minden, Claiborne Parish and El Dorado, Arkansas came together a few weeks later.  Those member included Robert Vance, Bobby White, Jeff Scarlett, Jeff Earl Scarlett, Gator McDade, Ethan Powell, Roger Pittman, Ronnie Sale, Crystal Vance and Barry Watson.  In one day of hard back-breaking work all the stones were put in place.  After 144 years these men finally have a head stone to show that they are there.  Saturday March 29th, 2008 at 1:00 PM a dedication ceremony will take place at the Minden Cemetery located on Bayou Avenue off Pine Street.  The public is invited to see this unique, living history lesson.  Sons of The Confederacy Camp members from El Dorado, Shreveport, Claiborne, Ruston, Farmerville and West Monroe are expected to participate in this long awaited event.  Civil War attire if at all possible but is not required to attend.  This will be a wonderful time to show children what history a cemetery holds and how important remembering the past is for our future. For more information you can contact Barry Watson at 371-9757 or watsonautosvc@bellsouth.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Press release March 29th, 2008 Grave dedication for Civil War Soldiers Old Minden Cemetery   Remembering the Unknown Veterans 144 Years Later   In the old section of the Minden Cemetery, in the back right corner marks the graves of over 20 unknown Civil War Confederate Soldiers.  This hallowed ground of 144 years has never been forgotten.  Even though the soldiers names may be lost forever to the future, their lives are remembered for their bravery and valor in April of 1864.  These men more than likely were from the Walker Texas Division and General Polinac's Division of Louisiana.  During the bloody and furious battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill these men were wounded and brought to Minden to be treated for their wounds.  Both of these divisions had been in Minden before, a few months earlier, they had wintered in or near Minden in 1864. These men had family and these men were loved just as the 100’s of soldiers that fought with the Minden Blue’s and other regiments from our area did.  Like so many Civil War soldiers many were lost and never heard from again.  They are somewhere across these United States buried in unmarked graves or left to scatter to the wind over 144 years ago.  Many a loved one would only hope that their dear departed would have been laid to rest with the respect that the long plot in the Minden Cemetery represents.  That is where this story really begins.  Over the years the names were lost if they were ever known of the soldiers in what has become known as the “Civil War Trench” it is estimated that somewhere between 20-30 bodies lie buried along this concrete line.  May 1, 1933, one of the worst tornados to ever hit Louisiana struck Minden causing a tremendous amount of damage to the cemetery.  A large monument belonging to the great inventor Samuel J. Webb was broken off.  This piece of stone was saved and later made in to what we have today as the “Trench” monument.  This stone was placed at the grave site by the Daughter’s of the Confederacy in May of 1936.  It reads “In Memory Of the Confederate Dead 1861-1864”  A few years ago, through genealogy research, one of these unnamed men would be identified by his family.  Thomas L. Anderson PVT  CO 1, 31 Texas Cavalry 1828-1864 was finally found by his family and given a grave marker to tell the world who he was.  Unfortunately the rest are still unknown but not forgotten.  In 2007 the T.M. Scott Camp of Minden’s Son’s of Confederate Veterans wanted to do something to honor these men.  The groups of men are direct descendants of Civil War Confederate Veterans.  They along with many other Civil War Camps across the country teach living history lessons in the forms of battle reenactments and encampments.  They also take on the cemeteries as projects; dedicating markers and helping descendents locate possible burial sites of unknown soldiers.  They are seen in parades and also have Civil War galas where you have the opportunity to step back in time and listen to authentic Civil War music, dress in hoop skirts and dance to the Virginia Reel. Barry Watson contacted Schelley Brown whom is a member of the Minden Cemetery Board several months ago with a request to erect markers for the unknown soldiers.  Brown stated, “Having worked with the Son’s of The Confederacy and the Daughter’s of the Confederacy on several occasion during the annual Minden Cemetery Ghost Walk, I was thrilled that they were taking this project under their wing.  I think this is a wonderful opportunity for the community to come together and remember these soldiers in a historic manner.” With the help of the Veteran’s Administration the forms were completed.  The 21 stones were delivered on a large pallet weighing over 5000 lbs., earlier this year.  Camp members from Minden, Claiborne Parish and El Dorado, Arkansas came together a few weeks later.  Those member included Robert Vance, Bobby White, Jeff Scarlett, Jeff Earl Scarlett, Gator McDade, Ethan Powell, Roger Pittman, Ronnie Sale, Crystal Vance and Barry Watson.  In one day of hard back-breaking work all the stones were put in place.  After 144 years these men finally have a head stone to show that they are there.  Saturday March 29th, 2008 at 1:00 PM a dedication ceremony will take place at the Minden Cemetery located on Bayou Avenue off Pine Street.  The public is invited to see this unique, living history lesson.  Sons of The Confederacy Camp members from El Dorado, Shreveport, Claiborne, Ruston, Farmerville and West Monroe are expected to participate in this long awaited event.  Civil War attire if at all possible but is not required to attend.  This will be a wonderful time to show children what history a cemetery holds and how important remembering the past is for our future. For more information you can contact Barry Watson at 371-9757 or watsonautosvc@bellsouth.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are two things you don't want to miss that will be happening in March!   Press Release: Monday March 10th, 2008 6:00 P.M. 116 Pearl Street The Dorcheat Historical Association Museum, Inc. Special Guest Speaker   “A Night at the Museum with Mr. Frank Griffith” Monday March 10th, 2008, Mr. Frank Griffith one of Minden’s longtime citizen’s will be the guest speaker at The Dorcheat Historical Association Museum’s next meeting.  This informative night dealing with Minden’s history will be held at the new Museum located at 116 Pearl Street in Minden, Louisiana.  Don’t miss this chance at hearing some exciting stories of Minden’s past as told from someone that has an astounding memory for detail and historic facts.  Mr. Griffith brought tears to many eyes this year at the Minden Cemetery Ghost walk, when he portrayed his father B.F. Griffith Sr. long time Sherriff in Webster Parish between 1900-1908.  B.F. Griffith Sr. lived until he was into his 90’s in the 1960’s.  B.F. Griffith Sr. is also one of the founders of the Webster Parish Fair.  Griffith Stadium is named in his honor and is located on the spot where in the early 20th century Mr. Griffith had a horse racing track constructed.  Many said his portrayal of his father was like stepping back in time to another era.  Mr. Griffith’s style of narration is best described as “it was like he was right there”.  He remembers vivid details of events and people that changed our community and are forever markers in time for Minden. This night of stories will begin at 6:00 P.M. so you don’t want to be late.  A large crowd is expected with a question and answer period to follow if time allows.  Admission is free of charge.  Museum director Schelley Brown stated, “This will give everyone the chance to see the progress of the museum and hear about the new additions that are in the works.”  For more information on “A Night at the Museum with Frank Griffith” please contact Schelley Brown at 318-423-0192.   Press release March 29th, 2008 Grave dedication for Civil War Soldiers Old Minden Cemetery   Remembering the Unknown Veterans 144 Years Later   In the old section of the Minden Cemetery, in the back right corner marks the graves of over 20 unknown Civil War Confederate Soldiers.  This hallowed ground of 144 years has never been forgotten.  Even though the soldiers names may be lost forever to the future, their lives are remembered for their bravery and valor in April of 1864.  These men more than likely were from the Walker Texas Division and General Polinac's Division of Louisiana.  During the bloody and furious battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill these men were wounded and brought to Minden to be treated for their wounds.  Both of these divisions had been in Minden before, a few months earlier, they had wintered in or near Minden in 1864. These men had family and these men were loved just as the 100’s of soldiers that fought with the Minden Blue’s and other regiments from our area did.  Like so many Civil War soldiers many were lost and never heard from again.  They are somewhere across these United States buried in unmarked graves or left to scatter to the wind over 144 years ago.  Many a loved one would only hope that their dear departed would have been laid to rest with the respect that the long plot in the Minden Cemetery represents.  That is where this story really begins.  Over the years the names were lost if they were ever known of the soldiers in what has become known as the “Civil War Trench” it is estimated that somewhere between 20-30 bodies lie buried along this concrete line.  May 1, 1933, one of the worst tornados to ever hit Louisiana struck Minden causing a tremendous amount of damage to the cemetery.  A large monument belonging to the great inventor Samuel J. Webb was broken off.  This piece of stone was saved and later made in to what we have today as the “Trench” monument.  This stone was placed at the grave site by the Daughter’s of the Confederacy in May of 1936.  It reads “In Memory Of the Confederate Dead 1861-1864”  A few years ago, through genealogy research, one of these unnamed men would be identified by his family.  Thomas L. Anderson PVT  CO 1, 31 Texas Cavalry 1828-1864 was finally found by his family and given a grave marker to tell the world who he was.  Unfortunately the rest are still unknown but not forgotten.  In 2007 the T.M. Scott Camp of Minden’s Son’s of Confederate Veterans wanted to do something to honor these men.  The groups of men are direct descendants of Civil War Confederate Veterans.  They along with many other Civil War Camps across the country teach living history lessons in the forms of battle reenactments and encampments.  They also take on the cemeteries as projects; dedicating markers and helping descendents locate possible burial sites of unknown soldiers.  They are seen in parades and also have Civil War galas where you have the opportunity to step back in time and listen to authentic Civil War music, dress in hoop skirts and dance to the Virginia Reel. Barry Watson contacted Schelley Brown whom is a member of the Minden Cemetery Board several months ago with a request to erect markers for the unknown soldiers.  Brown stated, “Having worked with the Son’s of The Confederacy and the Daughter’s of the Confederacy on several occasion during the annual Minden Cemetery Ghost Walk, I was thrilled that they were taking this project under their wing.  I think this is a wonderful opportunity for the community to come together and remember these soldiers in a historic manner.” With the help of the Veteran’s Administration the forms were completed.  The 21 stones were delivered on a large pallet weighing over 5000 lbs., earlier this year.  Camp members from Minden, Claiborne Parish and El Dorado, Arkansas came together a few weeks later.  Those member included Robert Vance, Bobby White, Jeff Scarlett, Jeff Earl Scarlett, Gator McDade, Ethan Powell, Roger Pittman, Ronnie Sale, Crystal Vance and Barry Watson.  In one day of hard back-breaking work all the stones were put in place.  After 144 years these men finally have a head stone to show that they are there.  Saturday March 29th, 2008 at 1:00 PM a dedication ceremony will take place at the Minden Cemetery located on Bayou Avenue off Pine Street.  The public is invited to see this unique, living history lesson.  Sons of The Confederacy Camp members from El Dorado, Shreveport, Claiborne, Ruston, Farmerville and West Monroe are expected to participate in this long awaited event.  Civil War attire if at all possible but is not required to attend.  This will be a wonderful time to show children what history a cemetery holds and how important remembering the past is for our future. For more information you can contact Barry Watson at 371-9757 or watsonautosvc@bellsouth.net

Dorcheat Historical Museum will be opening March 2008.  We need your help!

We are looking for the following items from Webster Parish to put on exhibit in our new museum.  The Dorcheat Historical Association Museum located at 116 Pearl Street in Minden will take you from the days of the Indians to current day life in our parish.  We have a timeline and exhibit theme that we are working with. This is a wonderful way for you to help your parish and preserve items that may just be stuck in an attic or trunk.  If you have something that would be of interest, that you would like to give to the museum please contact Schelley Brown at 318-423-0192 or iluvoldcars@yahoo.com .  Pictures can be copied so that you will be able to keep your originals.

Items that are needed:

Items that go back to earliest inhabitants of Webster Parish
1. Any Indian artifacts from this area or stories
2. Any fossils or primitive items from an early period

Items that represent Webster Parish Pioneer families these items must be from the parish.
1. Musical Instruments
2. Household goods, Churns, Tables, Chairs, Beds, Quilts, Plates, Lanterns, Lanterns, China, Bowls, Jars, Cans, Tins, Corn Husk Broom, Dolls, Toys, 
3. Farming equipment such as cotton sack, cotton baskets, any antique farm equipment
4. Vintage Clothes
5. Family Bibles & Photos
6. Stories from you family will be cataloged in our resource section
7. Working Victrola and 78's, old 30's type radio, old 50's style TV, juke box

Items that represent our communities and the buildings that have been torn down:
1.  Architectural items that came from early buildings
2.  Early light post
3.  Early signs from store fronts
4.  Early street signs
5.  Early photographs
6.  Early ledgers
7.  History and pictures of inside buildings and the history of the people that owned or worked there.
8.  Light fixtures, bricks, doors, windows etc from past buildings.
9.  Store fixtures, businesses calendar or other businesses promotional items, old phone books, phones, items from store.
10. Car lot and old car dealer items
11. Bus station items or pictures
12. Movie Theater items, Drug Store Soda Fountain items, Drive-Inn Theater items, skating rinks, race tracks. Bowling alleys
13.  Old home pictures and history plus pictures of the original owners and their history.

Items that represent our community workers:
1. Firemen related items, uniforms, equipment, pictures, etc.
2. Police related items, uniforms, equipment, pictures, etc.
3. Hospital, Medical and Dental items, such as any medical equipment or doctor bag, pictures and history of early doctors and nurses with pictures.
4. Lawyer and judicial items from past judges and lawyers of our parish.  Articles on famous cases or controversial cases that were tried in Webster parish
5. Mayors and city official items.  Pictures, history and significant items from the era such as old campaign signs and handouts.


Industry, Schools, Library, Railroad, Coca-Cola Company
1. Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant.  Any items to represent the significance of the plant to the area early pictures.  Pictures of disastrous explosions at the plant.
2. Lumber Mills from all eras.  Pictures and items that tell the importance of lumber in the area.  Including pictures of workers and stationary, pictures or equipment 
3. Timber companies.  Pictures of workers and the importance of this to our area.
4. L & A Railroad:  Any pictures and history of depots, trains, railroad men, signs, plates, silverware, bags, spittoons, railroad memorabilia, uniforms, caps, patches etc.
5. School items:  Winning game balls, uniforms, yearbooks, pictures, famous athlete's items.  Desk, slates, pencil boxes, school bell, pictures, any items to tell that school's history.  Famous people that graduated from a particular school.  Pictures of well known teachers and their accomplishments.
6. Any old pictures of the library systems from old bookmobile items or photos of library buildings that no longer exist. 
7. Any items that relate to Hunter's Playhouse and Coca-Cola Bottling of Minden
8. Cotton Valley Oilfield boom photos early Cotton Valley photos and history of people
9. Springhill paper mill and logging photos
10. Yellow Pine and the Globe lumber company items

Famous People:  Webster Parish has many famous people from this area.  Musicians, Athletes, Artist, Dancers, Beauty Queens, Writers, Singers, Lawyers, Judges and inventors.
1. Any pictures of famous people from our area
2. Any keepsakes such as baseball, footballs, etc from sports greats
3. Sports cards of these players
4. Game programs pro and high school
5. Uniforms and equipment that they used
6. Musical instruments
7. Albums or CD's
8. Pictures taken in concert
9. Early photos to show their life in Webster parish before they became famous, Year books, family photos, etc.
10. Books they have written
11. Autographs
12. Personal items such as early childhood toys, clothes, shoes, original manuscripts or songs written in their handwriting.
13. DVD's
14. Old Film footage can be taken and made into DVD's for showing in the exhibit.
15. Paton information on inventions or pictures.
16. Paintings or prints

Just some of our famous people include:

Musicians: Gene Austin, Percy Mayfield, Joe Stampley, James Burton, The Cox Family, Trace Adkins

Athletes:  John David Crow, Charlie Hennigan, David Lee, Danny Lee, Louis Dunbar, John Stevens just to name a small few.

Educators, Writers and Artist:  Ben Earl Looney, Tam Spiva, Ada Jack Carver Snell, Mary Williams Mims just to name a small few.

Disaster of Webster Parish especially the 1933 disasters:
1. Fire photos
2. Tornado damage photos all years
3. Banks closings during depression stories or photos
4. Ammunition Plant explosions photos or articles
5. Drought or flood
6. Items that may have been saved from these disasters

Churches:
1. History of Churches
2. Old Photos churches, famous Pastors or congregations
3. Any old religious items

War Items:
History of Webster Parish Veterans such as uniforms, photos, weapons, memorabilia, letters, medals etc.
1. Civil War
2. World War I
3. World War II
4. Korean
5. Vietnam
6. Current Wars

Please contact us to look at what items you have stored away. The Dorcheat Museum may have the perfect spot in one of our exhibits.  Help us create a museum that we can all be proud of.

          
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