A TRIBUTE TO LARRY AND GLADYS HUNTER

                      

 Introduction

I am pleased to be working with Sherry Gritzbaugh on A Tribute to Larry & Gladys                   
Hunter.The book, Memories of Hunters is available at the Coca-Cola offices in Minden, .
La. Working on this project with Sherry  and me are Nan Hunter Castle and Ann
Mays Harlan. This presentation will be the story of Larry and Gladys Hunter's
dedication to the young people of Minden and the memories of these young
people. If you would like to submit a memory, e-mail it to this site.

Memories of Hunters is available at the Coca-Cola offices in Minden, .
La. Working on this project with Sherry  and me are Nan Hunter Castle and Ann
Mays Harlan. This presentation will be the story of Larry and Gladys Hunter's
dedication to the young people of Minden and the memories of these young
people. If you would like to submit a memory, e-mail it to this site.

 

mindenmemories@aol.com

 

A SPECIAL MEMORY

 It started December 7, 1941. Many of Papa's ballplayers, friends, employees an
own sons went to serve their country during WWII. He did his best to keep the morale of "his of the boys up. A mailing list was begun. Each one had a page for things that interested him alone or a general interest page. Every day at the office, I did the routing work while Papa was "banging away" on his old Underwood typewriter. He did not have time to proofread the typing errors. This, blended with some unusual grammar, made his letters unique.

One day he asked me to ride with him to Main Street to meet a route truck. He got out while I parked the car. When I saw him again, there he was, camera in hand, perched on the back of the route truck snapping pictures of Minden's main  Minden's Main St. Those pictures were later used as letterheads for his letter writing to all the boys. I liked  helping helping because it gave him more time to write and they were my friends too.

 In addition to writing letters, Mama and Papa entertained Airmen from Barksdale Airbase and soldiers on Maneuvers in North Louisiana. Mama did most of the work on the home front.

 Toward the end of the war, Papa sent the attached poem to Carter Norman and Gene
Rogers. They were infantry soldiers who were in high risk zones.

              

              

                  All of my memories are of Larry & Gladys Hunter, my Mother and Father,
                  my Mama & Papa, all the same couple that quite a few of our friends called
                  "Mama and Papa" also, I shall refer to them as "Mama and Papa".

                                 

To list all the baseball players I watched play, went on trips with and became friends with would be impossible. There were so many many with would be impossible. There were so many. About 1939friends with would be impossible. There were so many. About 1939 "Papa" went to spring training in Florida to watch his Major League heroes get ready for theupcoming season. He made three trips that I knew of. None of them included me. This was his time!

The first trip he did was to take some local prospects to a baseball try out school. Carter Norman was one of the local prospects. I will have to let him and the others tell about it. Grady Jeter and Whit Vascocu went to Umpire school.

One trip down to Florida just included Papa and his dear friend, James Rabb, a real baseball fan, friend and employee. This was in the days of segregation. They knew problems and planned ahead. They were not allowed to eat or sleep in the same motel or restaurant or motel. They could not not even watch the game together. "Papa" took a dark green salesman's hat. Several times Rabb would putit on and become his head and he would become his chauffeur. Think of how they could enjoy the trip together today! his personal friends we t with him one year.  Tom Campbell, Jack Hunter, his brother, and Leland Winn. They started calling Leland "Judge" on the trip and it stuck. They all agreed he was the worst driver threat to their lives. Their friendship survived. They watched many Big 8 League  League games together after that.

FINAL DAYS

The treatment gave him leukemia. he fought death hard and long. Along the wayhe was gratified by the love and attention he received from his many friends. Whenthe end came the funeral was as I thought it should be.

                                                           

Mr. Hunter after a fishing trip.  On the back of the photo is the following:
                                Bream Time                                                        
    When the clover and blue bonnets are blooming,
    When the bob white whistles on the lake bank,
    When the whippoorwill sings at night,
    It's bream time in north Louisiana.

 Submitted by Maurice Whitlow 8/8/05

Below are the other snap shots that Mr. Hunter sent me. As you can see, he was in good shape for a 73 year old man. His notes were short, but I really enjoyed receiving them. Maurice Whitlow, Whitlow, Class of 1948, former Redbird Baseball Player

 

 

 

 

 

        

  

 To list all the baseball players I watched play, went on trips with and became friends with would be impossible. There were so many many with would be impossible. There were so many. About 1939friends with would be impossible. There were so many. About 1939 "Papa" wentto spring training in Florida to watch his Major League heroes get ready for theupcoming season. He made three trips that I knew of. None of them included me. This was his time!

The first trip he did was to take some local prospects to a baseball tryoutschool. Carter Norman was one of the local prospects. I will have to let him and the others tell about it. Grady Jeter and Whit Vascocu went to Umpire school.

One trip down to Florida just included Papa and his dear friend, James Rabb, a real baseball fan, friend and employee. This was in the days of segregation. Theyknew problems and planned ahead. They were not allowed to eat or sleep in thesame motel or restaurant or motel. They could not not even watch the game together. "Papa" took a dark green salesman's hat. Several times Rabb would putit on and become his head and he would become his chauffeur. Think of how theycould enjoy the trip together today! his personal friends we t with him one year.  Tom Campbell, Jack Hunter, his brother, and Leland Winn. They started calling Leland "Judge" on the trip and it stuck. They all agreed he was the worst driver threat to their lives. Their friendship survived. They watched many Big 8 League  League games together after that.

FINAL DAYS

The treatment gave him leukemia. he fought death hard and long. Along the wayhe was gratified by the love and attention he received from his many friends. Whenthe end came the funeral was as I thought it should be.

                                                                                                                                                                                   
        

The church was overflowing. The crowd had men and women from every walk of
life. The pallbearers were his employees. The eulogy was excellent and given by Steve
Cole. Steve took advantage of "Hunters" in the late thirties. Played baseball, danced,
worked at the Coca-Cola plant, wrote and received letters during WWII. He chaperoned
the Playhouse in the fifties. He was and still is one of my best friends. Steve said
everything right. The procession to the cemetery went down Main St. Minden said goodbye and thanks.                                                                                                                                                                                     


                  MINDEN PRESS HERALD - February 8, 1971

                             Larry Hunter Dies, Services Are Today One of the city's leading  citizens, Larry Hunter, age 74, died in the Minden

                              Sanitarium on Saturday evening, February 6, after a long illness.

Mr. Hunter was a native of Minden, and lifelong resident of the city.  He is survived by his widow; four sons, Bill Hunter, Joe Hunter, Ben Hunter, all of Minden, and Joel Gearhart of Homer; two daughters, Mrs. Bess Hunter of Minden, and Mrs. Nan Castle of Sarasota, Florida; one brother, Jack D. Hunter of Minden; one sister, Mrs. Florine Robertson of Homer; ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Larry Hunter was a pioneer Coca-Cola Bottler in the city.  His father began bottling Coca-Cola in Webster Parish in 1901. After the death of his father in 1919, Mr. Hunter stayed active in the bottling business until his death.

                              Funeral services for Mr. Hunter will be held at 4:00 p.m. in the First Methodist Church in Minden.  Dr. Henry Rickey,

                             pastor of the First Methodist will conduct services.

Burial will be in Minden Cemetery under direction of Green-Kleinegger. Pallbearer for the services will be Coy Bohannon, N.A. Dulany, Bill Franklin, Alton Gandy, Jimmy W. Maddox, Raymond Plunkett, James Rabb, J. W. Wall, all employees of the Coca-Cola Bottling Company. The Hunter family has requested those who want to give memorial gifts, instead of flowers, to do so to either the building fund of the First Methodist Church or to the Minden Recreation Commission. In addition to his dedication to Coca-Cola, he dedicated himself to young people. It all started with a large family and their friends and a consuming interest in baseball. The first teen-age center in Minden was Mr. and Mrs. Hunter's own "Little Playhouse." In 1946 a larger place was needed, so they built the "Big Playhouse," or "Hunter's" as it became known.  "Hunter's" was the teen-ager's social center in Minden until about 1963. Mr. Hunter organized the first playground baseball team in 1939.  In 1940 the baseball park, playground and swimming pool were built.  Until 1950 he was active promoting youth baseball and American Legion Baseball.  His 1949 American Legion team was the state runners-up. During this period he took teams on tours after the regular season.  Teams were played from New Mexico to Florida.  Promising baseball players were taken to Major League try-out camps.  Many played professional baseball with several going to the Major Leagues.  During this time untold friendships were made--Major League players, ex-players, business men, sportsmen, and youth all over the South.  An ex-Major Leaguer, Kid Eberfield, came to Minden in 1940 and helped him start his baseball program.

The first teen-age center in Minden was Mr. and Mrs. Hunter's own "Little Playhouse." In 1946 a larger place was needed, so they built the "Big Playhouse," or "Hunter's" as it became known.  "Hunter's" was the teen-ager's social center in Minden until about 1963. Mr. Hunter organized the first playground baseball team in 1939.  In 1940 the baseball park, playground and swimming pool were built.  Until 1950 he was active promoting youth baseball and American Legion Baseball.  His 1949 American Legion team was the state runners-up. During this period he took teams on tours after the regular season.  Teams were played from New Mexico to Florida.  Promising baseball players were taken to Major League try-out camps.  Many played professional baseball with several going to the Major Leagues.  During this time untold friendships were made--Major League players, ex-players, business men, sportsmen, and youth all over the South.  An ex-Major Leaguer, Kid Eberfield, came to Minden in 1940 and helped him start his baseball program

In 1952 the playground, pool, baseball park, and Hunter's began being operated by the city.  Mr. Hunter became a baseball fan at that time. The City Recreation Program was developing then.  In 1953 the baseball park was moved to the Fairgrounds and became known as Griffith Stadium. A few years later the City built their own pools and playgrounds, and Hunter's Playground was closed. In 1946 Mr. and Mrs. Hunter were named "Citizen of the Year," receiving the first award given. The award was later changed to "Man of the Year." In 1969 Mayor Tom Colten presented to Mr. Hunter the key to the City in ceremonies preceding the First Dixie League Contest of the 1969 season.  A certificate for his outstanding contributions to the Minden Recreation Program was presented at the same time. Mr. Hunter was known for Coca-Cola, Baseball, Recreation, friends, and being one of Lake Bistineau's best Fishermen.

Gladys Hunter died a short year and a half after Papa's death while visiting Nan in Sarasato, Florida.

Minden Press-Herald, Front Page, Monday, June 11, 1973
 
Funeral Services Will Be Held For Mrs. Gladys Hunter Tuesday
Funeral services for Mrs. Gladys P. Hunter, 73, will be held at 2 p.m., Tuesday in the First United Methodist Church with the Rev. Kirby Vining officiating.
Burial will be in Minden Cemetery under the direction of Green-Kleinegger Funeral Home.
Gladys Hunter, widow of Larry B. Hunter, died suddenly Saturday afternoon in Sarasota, Florida, while visiting her daughter.
Born in Yellowpine, she taught school in the Webster Parish School system until her marriage to Larry B. Hunter.  Her interest in education continued and she was twice elected to the Webster Parish School Board.
Gladys and Larry Hunter operated the Coca-Cola Bottling Company in Minden.  With Coca-Cola profits, they built for the young.  Starting with their own "Little Playhouse," they "later" built the "Big Playhouse," a playground, baseball park and swimming pool for the teenagers of Minden.
In 1946, Mr. and Mrs. Hunter were named "Citizens of the Year," receiving the first such award given.  Mrs. Hunter was the only woman ever to receive the award.
Survivors are four sons, Bill Hunter, Joe Hunter, and Ben Hunter, all of Minden, and Joel Gearhart of Homer; two daughters, Bess Hunter of Minden and Mrs. Nan Castle of Sarasota, Florida; a brother, Clifford Powell of Shreveport; eleven grandchildren and two great grandchildren.
Those serving as pallbearers will be N. A. Dulany, J. W. Wall, James Rabb, Reese Simmons, Carter B. Norman, Cecil C. Lowe, Hale R. Shadow and Steve Cole.

 

MINDEN CITY CEMETERY SECTION A

Larry B. Hunter 20 Mar. 1896 - 06 Feb. 1971

Gladys P. Hunter 24 Aug. 1889 - 09 Jun. 1973

 

Bill Hunter     03 Jul 1922 - 05 Feb. 1999

Bill was a soldier in the South Pacific for 2-3 years and was responsible for the 

 reburial of American soldiers in New Guinea during WWII.

From the 1940 Minden High School Grig   
Billy Hunter:      Reserved
                        Glee Club, '38,'39,'40
                        Band, '38,'39

         Coca-Cola Work History:

From 1947  to 1972, Bill formulated company policy, made decisions and  generally managed the company                                                                                                                                              

decisions opted opting to retire at age 50 and become a world traveler

    Courtesy of the Rising Tide

     

      

                     

Minden Press-Herald, Front Page, Monday, February 8, 1999
 
Former Coke President Bill Hunter dies
 
Bill Hunter, former chairman of the board and president of the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Minden, Inc. died Sunday, Feb. 7 of cancer.  He was 75.
Bill was enrolled at LSU when he was called to serve in World War II.  He was stationed in New Guinea and Luzon of the Philippines.  Upon returning home, he became manager, and soon after, president of the family business.
Working with him were his brothers, Joe and Ben and his sister, Bess.  Nan married Frank Castle and lives in Sarasota.  In 1973 Bill retired, but remained on the board of directors as chairman.
Bill had two driving interests, baseball and traveling.  He was deeply involved with the Big 8 League.  As business manager and chief scout for players he led the Minden Redbirds to a Big 8 League pennant in 1957.
His travels took him to all four corners of the world.  Some of his trips saw him crossing Communist Russia on the Trans-Siberian Railroad, trekking the Himalayas, navigating the Northwest Passage, making two visits to Antarctica, and many other trips.  His last trip was in September 1998.  He flew to Aqaba, Jordan, boarded a clipper ship and sailed to Thailand.
Bill has requested cremation and no formal service.  He wants to be remembered as a happy traveler and fortunate to have been able to do so.  In keeping with Bill's wishes, a celebration of his life will be held at 4 p.m., Feb. 10 at the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Minden, 412 Pine Street, Minden, Louisiana. 
After 25 years of traveling, he collected many artifacts and pictures.  Some will be on display at the open house.
We will remember Bill as he was.  Memorials should be sent to the Larry and Gladys Hunter Scholarship Fund, P. O. Box 893, Minden, La.

 

 

 Photo by Bob Grambling

Bess Hunter       

27 Mar. 1934 - 09 Sep. 1993

Minden Press-Herald, Wednesday, September 8, 1993
 
Bess Hunter
 
"Death be not proud, though some have called thee mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so."
Bess Hunter, in the presence of her children, died Sunday afternoon, September 5.
Her wishes, which are being honored, were that she depart this life quietly.  Therefore, she will not lie in state, nor will there be any interment services.  There will be a memorial service at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at First United Methodist Church in Minden to celebrate her life.
Bess wanted to be remembered with laughter, joy and love, and if that weren't possible, she'd rather not be remembered at all.
She has left behind her son, Larry Hunter, and her daughter and son-in-law, Julie and Micky Malham.  Her grandchildren, Adrienne, Selese, Laura, Zachary and Kenneth, will all miss her hugs and kisses, her loving heart and her endless supply of bubble gum.
Bess will also be greatly missed by her loving sister, Nan Castle, and her three brothers.
Memorials can be made to the American Heart Association or to the Larry and Gladys Hunter Scholarship Fund.

 

Sam Hunter         09 Apr. 1932 - 29 Aug. 1936

Joel William Gearhart Jr. 05 Nov. 1924 - 26 Dec. 1983
81 US Navy WW II

 

      JOEL GEARHART

             By Ben Hunter                         

Joel died in 1924. Since he cannot write his own "Memories" I shall try to do
it for him.

He came to visit the Robertson's in Homer one summer. His Mother was a single
working lady in New York City. Joel was probably eleven or twelve years old at the
time, he came to visit us in Minden and stayed. His and my relationship was as a
foster brother but actually just two friends. The years that Joel spent with us saw him
through a difficult time in high school. He was enrolled in Georgia Military Academy.
He ran away and bell hopped. Joel was a popular guy. He was handsome, could dance
and was personable. During the time he was best friends with Van Norman. Joel
enlisted in the Navy and when W.W.II ended was training as Tail Gunner on a Navy
Bomber that flew off Carriers.

Joel came home, to Minden, and picked up his life. During the next four years
I shared his confidences and he mine. I was with him at his wedding to Bonnie, kept
in contact when they moved to Florida and even visited him in Florida.

They moved back to Minden. Linda and I partied, bowled, and played golf with them.
Joel worked at the Coca-Cola plant but there just wasn't enough opportunity, so he,
along with his friend Van Norman, as well as three others left and worked elsewhere.
They made wise decisions.

Joel was a true friend. His death was long and painful. He was brave to the end. I am
a better person for knowing him.

                   

 
BASEBALL MEMORIES (1936 - 1940) by Ben Hunter

In the beginning Papa was the pitcher, the umpire, and the baseball commissioner.
He set the rules. Hit the pine tree in left field or knock one over the recreation room, and
you got a Coca-Cola and/or a candy bar. But I think the tennis ball made me fear the
baseball. After one year of baseball I quit. I was scared at bat. Papa was disappointed,
but it didn't affect our relationship.


FISH ALWAYS BITE ON MONDAY (1955) by Ben Hunter

It was probably Monday (fish always bit on Monday) in 1950s when Papa came
home early and instructed me to get down to Lake Bistineau now! Only stop and
get some worms at Alex's bait stand. The "blue gill bream" were schooling"
and he had caught a big number, but he had to leave. All were caught on his fly rod and and artificial lure. I had always wanted to try my hand. After thirty minutes of
frustration, Preacher, his guide, put a worm and cork on my pole and I caught thirty
or forty. My respect for Papa's fishing ability was set forever.

 

               

                                               

                                      Ben Graduates from Northwestern State College

                    

                          

Because of the historical nature of these letters they are neither edited or retyped.

           Mrs. Larry "Gladys" Hunter was the first lady to serve on the Webster Parish School Board.

                                        

                                                                 Joe Hunter

         Joe Hunter as portrayed by Columnist Juanita Agan in the Minden Press-Herald

  • SERVING GOD AND COCA COLA

    This is the way that he describes himself: "I was born on Coca-Cola Hill, I grew up on Coca-Cola Hill, I married while living on Coca-Cola Hill, and my wife and I lived on Coca-Cola Hill until in 1972 we moved far away about two miles across town to Drake Drive." And that is where they still live.

    The name "Hunter" is just so closely associated with Coca-Cola Bottling Company that you already know I am writing about Joe Hunter, who spent forty years in production at the local plant.

    Joe was born to Larry and Gladys Hunter. As he tells it, someone came down to the plant and told Larry that his wife was about to give birth to Joe. Larry left, went up to the house, stayed until Joe was born, and then went back to work. That is the pattern of life for the Hunter family the work ethic was not just taught but it was lived out before the seven children.

    School and Work

    His earliest recollection of school was a strong dislike of it. He had to walk behind his brother, Bill, who made straight As and did everything just as it should be done.

    Joe remembered getting into trouble in the first grade and things just went downhill thereafter. He will have to tell you about what transpired in the boy's bathroom that brought problems for Joe.

    All the children began working at age six in the Coca-Cola Bottling plant. When he was 16 he took over the production at the plant.

    He came in from school at about three in the afternoon and worked for about three hours and then he worked all day Saturday. He finished school in 1943, and in 1944 he joined the Navy. These were the war years when everything, including Coca-Cola Syrup was rationed.

    Joe left his childhood sweetheart, Polly Moreland, when he went into boot camp.

    Boot Camp

    Boot Training Camp at Camp Wallace which was located between Houston and Galveston. From there he went to General Detail Camp at Camp Pendleton, Calif. He volunteered for small boats and ended up in the CinCPac boat crew. The next 21 months they were just part of Admiral Nimitz Staff at Pearl Harbor and Guam. For a while he was Stern Hook on Admiral Nimitz's barge which was a 40 ft. motor boat.

    Later he was Coxswain on one of the Captain's gig which as a 35 ft. motor boat.

    Back to Coca-Cola

    In May 1946 he received his discharge from the Navy. Polly had waited faithfully (if lonely) for Joe's return.

    June 1, 1946 he and Polly were married. And then it was back to the production of Coca Colas for this area. He loved his work and continued until his retirement in 1984. In 1949 the first of their two sons, Don, was born, and in 1951 the other son, Bob, made his appearance. Now there are three grandchildren, and four great grandchildren, a wonderful family.

    The pastor at the Methodist Church was Merlin Merrill, a close friend of Joe and Polly, and he started Joe on his spiritual journey


    A Calling

    The next years were busy and happy years for this family. However the early 1970s were not good years for Joe. Joe lost both his parents, and the business was not doing good. This was a stressful time in their life. Joe and Polly drew closer to God, and sought out His way for their life. Joe said they received the baptism of the Holy Spirit.

    God spoke to Joe in a little quiet voice but it was a request. Joe said that the voice said "I want to use you." But Joe drug his feet.

    He did not immediately follow through with what God has requested of him. About that time a friend, Joe Windham, came by and said that he and Jack Maxey were going to be Methodist Pastors. Of course you must realize that Joe was reared in a strong Presbyterian home, and he married a Baptist girl, and together they joined the Methodist Church. So when Joe Windham told our Joe Hunter the news of his entering the ministry, Joe Hunter said "No way!" These men told Joe

    that there was a back door called "license to preach" and course of studies which led to local pastors. After a lot of prayer Joe started with them in 1978.

    A Career

    Joe was appointed to his first church in June 1979. It was the Clay Methodist church seven miles south of Ruston. Joe was a part-time local pastor. He pastored there for three years. He came back to be part-time associate pastor of the local First Methodist Church for three and one half years. The next five and one half years were spent at the Whitehall Methodist Church, the Methodist and Baptist church at Evergreen, and the Methodist and Baptist Church at Colquitt, and finally to the Pleasant Valley Methodist Church where he is in his 10th year.

    Joe did his courses of study at St.Paul's School of Theology in Kansas City, and finished in 1986.
    In the Methodist Church when you turn 70 before conference time you must retire. So in 1996 Joe retired, but he didn't stop preaching.

    Still Serving

    Officially he is retired full time local pastor, and still serving at the Pleasant Valley Methodist Church. This makes 22 years of pastoring and Joe is still going strong, serving God in a very special way.

    Joe is involved in a special ministry sponsored by the Upper Room Ministries that is called "The Walk to Emmaus." It is a spiritual retreat and a time for a renewal of faith and to help them to become better members in the church where they serve.

    Joe has received many honors locally in Minden, and from his work in the Methodist faith. He said he feels most honored by the people who have requested that he be the one to conduct their funeral services

    And Joe is still on the Board of Directors of the local Coca-Cola Bottling Plant, and of course, his favorite drink is Coca-Cola, did you need to ask?

    These days when life is so full of stress, and people have chosen the way of the world rather than follow in the steps of Jesus, it renews my faith, and makes my heart glad to point out Joe Hunter in his role of pastor to many small Methodist churches where he is loved and appreciated. As he talks of his life and his walk with the Master there is a radiance about him that tells me he HAS been with the Master. I feel honored to know such a man.

    Juanita Agan has lived in Minden since 1935. Her column appears Wednesdays in the Minden Press-Herald.

                        MEMORIES FROM MRS. JOE HUNTER

.

                             MEMORIES FROM THE YOUNGEST CHILD

                              

                                                 NAN HUNTER CASTLE

    Note: This copy brought back memories of Miss Smith

and the Underwood typewriter's we used at Minden High School. 

 Is it possible Nan typed this on Mr. Hunter's famous Underwood

 typewriter that he used during World War II?  Nan, thank you

 for another fond memory of our school days. Thank goodness we

 no longer have to clean type or change ribbons.

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   From Nan Hunter

 

                                               LETTERS FROM FRIENDS

                               

.

                                                                                                              

                         A TRIBUTE TO MR. AND MRS. LARRY B. HUNTER

                                                            Dr. Jack Gamble

 

                            

 T. C. BLOXOM, JR.

  CHIEF OF POLICE AND FIRE CHIEF

 

LARMAR "MOLLY" PACE

CHARLIE HENNIGAN - CLASS OF 1953

  

CORA LOU BROWN ROBINSON - CLASS OF 1953

 

 

   

JOYCE DULANY ANDERSON - CLASS OF 1952

 

  CHIEF OF POLICE AND FIRE CHIEF

 

LARMAR "MOLLY" PACE

CORA LOU BROWN ROBINSON - CLASS OF 1953

 

 

 JOYCE DULANY ANDERSON - CLASS OF 1952

 

JAMIE MAYS VANCE - CLASS OF 1959

                                                REGINALD W. ADAMS

From Eugne Frazier

Dear Nan:

As I start writing  many memories flood into my head triggering emotions and thoughts of joy  and sadness.Joy because I had the privilege of being raised in Mindistance and death separate that from  my life now. "TIME MARCHES ON" is true every thought a person is never ready for that place  in your life. There is much sadness when I go back to Minden, go by the coke plant and there is no Hunter house, and no playhouse, no pool or park I also realize that friends have died and as they get older it to will pass on and another part of  the Hunter Legacy will be put to rest. It has been a privilege and honor to bepart of that legacy.

Those were special times in many lives.  There are many memories of the times that I came in contact with Mr. and Mrs. Hunter but one in particular is of Mr. Hunter. 

It was a Saturday afternoon and I had just gotten off work at Sanitary Dairy and had walked up the hill when I heard the fire horn sound. I looked back and saw and house burning behind the Dairy. I knew I could not see anything so I just walked up the hill and proceeded to set on a park bench. The fire truck zoomed by with sirens blowing and the bells and  whistles blowing.

 It was quite a bit of noise. I could see black smoke pouring out of the burning house and people standing  around but no one   was in serious trouble so I just set back and relaxed.  Well about that time here comes Mr. Hunter driving  up and he stopped.  He began laughing and joked about how I was the only person in Minden that could set back and watch Minden burn to the  ground. I found out later that he had told everyone in town old Tommy Ashcroft sat back and watched Minden burn. He loved  to tease me with that story every time Of course, the story got more out of the true content each time he told it.

Well I guess that I could write page after page of the guy of Minden and the Hunters, but in summary of Joy of Memories  it can be said in several words: 'THANK YOU MR. AND MRS. HUNTER FOR BEING MY FRIEND AND WELL . . .

                                                      A GOOD INFLUENCE ON MY LIFE."

In the emotion and thoughts of sadness that the Hunter phase of life is over and can never come to life again distance and death separate that from  my life now. "TIME MARCHES ON" is true every thought a person is never ready for that place  in your life. There is much sadness when I go back to Minden, go by the coke plant and there is no Hunter house, and no playhouse, no pool or park I also realize that friends have died and as they get older it to will pass on and another part of  the Hunter Legacy will be put to rest. It has been a privilege and honor to be part of that legacy.

                                                 Tom Ashcroft

    

From Eugne Frazier

                 SUMMER OF 1944  - HUNTER MEMORIES FROM GAIL CLAY

                                  Regina Ford Heinke