THE STORY OF WAL-MART

                    

                                                            The History of of The Land & The People Who Lived There

                                                                               by LeVerne Langheld Kidd
                                   Previous Owners of the Land were Nickerson, Peabody, Ratcliff, Langheld and Kidd

Joseph T. Ratcliff  (brother to Lery Ratliff ) born 22 Jan. 1874 died 9 Apr. 1848 Section B-1 md.  10 Jun. 1903 to Minnie Estelle Musgrove born14 Jul. 1879 died 26 Apr. 1933 in Minden. Children were Ethel Ann (never md.) Herman Isiah.                          
Myrtis Wade, Lillian Estelle, Joseph Ernest, and Johnny Ardis Ratcliff.
Sarah Wade Ratcliff retired in 1976 after serving over twenty years as a missionary in Central America. She attended God's Bible College In Cincinnati, Oh.  (13 Jun. 1911-1991) She was the daughter:Leary Ratcliff born 19 Nov. 1867 died 4 Sep. 1927 md. 1st. Alice Peabody 02 Dec. 19 md. 2nd. Emma Peabody 22 Dec. 1903
Alice Peabody born 11 Dec. 1875 died 11 Dec. 1902 Both were daughters of Albert and Sarah Jane Peabody.Jonah W. born 20 Dec. 1894 in Ark. died 17 May 1948 WW1 France.
Alice Ratcliff born 2 Dec. 1904 in Minden, La. died 19 Nov. md. 28 Sep. 1929 Minden, La.
Also interred in Section A South with the Ratcliff Family is: Richard Slade was born in Shreveport 25 August 1936 and died 26 August 1936 In the Gardens of Memory I find a double  monuments for: Herman I. Ratcliff born 29 Oct. 1905 died 18 Dec. 1968 and Rae M. in row 2, section 1 Garden of the Lord's Supper.


Section A Southeast - (Rough concrete stone with no graves visible; ones here should be shown below).
Albert Peabody 23 Apr 1840      died  05 May  1912
Sarah Jane Peabody 22 Jul 1848 died  28 Oct. 1930
Known children)
Mary Emma Peabody    09 Dec. 1870 died 26 Sept 1956  md. Leary Ratcliff in 1903


In the above photograph is Miss Nettie Peabody  born 08 Aug. 1873 died 28 Aug. 1971 when she was teaching at Gods Bible School in Cincinnatti, Ohio during 1950/51.
Alice Helen Peabody      11 Dec. 1875 died 11 Dec. 1902  md. Leary Ratcliff in 1900
Anna Peabody   25 Nov. 1877 died 09 Dec. 1972 md. William H. Luck ca 1901 Cora  Peabody  03 Oct. 1880 died 31 May  1883

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Section A West Luck Plot

William H. Luck 12 Oct. 1869 died 08 Mar. 1951 md. Anna Peabody

He made the first school bus bodies, made of wood. This family lived where Minden Bldg. & Loan is located today.
Known Children:

Ruth Luck  04 Oct. 1907 died 26 Apr. 1911

William H. Martin, Jr. 25  Jun.  1911 died 18 Oct. 1996 MAM US Navy WWII md.
Elizabeth M. Martin
John P. Luck 22  Jul.   1918 died 22 May  1993 CPL  U S Marine Corps Vietnam md. Martha Moreland
Mrs. Meriam Luck md. Mr.  Hutchinson

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Section E. Martin Plot

Joe Martin 07 Aug. 1870 died 16 Sep. 1950 Woodmen of the World
He owned a feed store in Minden, La.
Allie Wilson Martin  30 Jul.   1879 died 1946 parents of:
Elizabeth M. Martin Luck 25 Jan.   1910 died 1997 md. William H. "Bill" Luck, Jr.

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Nickerson Plot - Section A West
Mary A. Nickerson Born at Blackawton, England 21 May 1838 Died 18 Apr. 1913
Pocahontas Nickerson 1857-1908
Sallie Nickerson           1867-1921 Our beloved sister
James Nickerson          1862-1921 Our beloved brother
Mary Nickerson           1860-1942 married John Miller born 1862 died 1939

Compliments of Leverne Langheld Kidd - only child Of the late Mr. & Mrs. E. E. Langheld.                                                                  

Wal Mart was built on this land.

Mrs. John (Mary Nickerson)  Miller is interred in Section A West of the Minden Cemetery  1860-1942
daughter of  Mrs. Mary A. Nickerson born at Blackawton, England born 21 May 1838.

Bessie L. Young and Edgar E. Langheld are interred in the Gardens of Memory on the Lewisville in Minden.

Row 10; Section 2, Garden of the Good Shepherd. (See the Journey of the Wheel
to read about the Langheld and Miller families under Stories) There is also a picture of
the old homeplace under Journey of A Wheel.

Daddy's birthplace was in Claiborne Parish. He lived there until he purchased his first
piece of property on Bicycle Road in Claiborne Parish, La. not far from the Webster Parish
Line on the Germantown Road about 1940.

Here is how the Langheld property looked before "Wallie World" Wal-Mart invaded. The
first pictures will be "THE BEFORE".




2 Pixs (File # 1)( North & South WRONG) Should read East & West .  I took this shot at the red light on 531 & the Homer Rd. (531,  if you recall, connects to Interstate 20)

Top pix, I was looking down the Homer Rd, West toward Minden. There's a little clearing all the way down on the right of the photo, that's Daddy & Uncle Dillards' driveways. Notice all the woods along the hwy. 



These picture were taken one month before the construction began on the Super Center. Thank goodness I took these, because the landscape changed so rapidly!  As you'll see.The next (pix #2), shows the two driveways, one veered to the left to Daddy's house (file # 3) and Dillard's drive went down a wooded drive to the right, (file # 4).

Daddy sold his younger brother Dillard, 40 acres about 1947 for the same price he'd paid for it, sounds just like something my Daddy would have done. Taking care of his little brother.

 For a long time when I would go to Wal-Mart to shop,  I would remember that I was walking where Dillard's house and garden once stood.           

 It gave me a strange feeling!

Dillard B. Langheld 6 Sep 1914 died 16 Sep.1986 md. Lola M. born 25 Aug. 1919. She is still living. To this union was born: Lottie, Jerry Willis & Roy.  Billy Jack Langheld, the youngest child, is buried near his Dad in Section J-2 of the Minden Cemetery. He  was  born on Oct. 10, 1948 died Feb. 28, 1957. He accidentally hung himself with a venetian blind cord while jumping on his bed when he fell off.  The medal clamp on the cord caught him around the neck. His second grade classmates sang at his funeral service. It was a very sad day for all of us.

Photographs' s Compliments of LeVerne Langheld Kidd

Here the "After" photos.
 
File #-1-- D. B. 's Property--without all the trees and undergrowth and switch cane that grew between Dillard and Dad's house.
A little side note here about switch cane. Dillard planted it and my Dad hated the stuff, but never said a word his younger brother Dillard. That was my Dad, he'd just get his hoe cut it off and dig it up. Dad's big garden was near Dillard house where all this switch cane grew as a very rapid rate. Switch cane will grow  3 - 4 feet a day up to about 20 feet in heights, while putting up other shoots and so it goes, so before long it will take over a plot of ground very rapidly.





Now, look at the 3rd photo on the far left and notice the pale green growth, you got it, switch cane. As you can see in the 2nd                            
picture there's nothing but dirt and roots.  I remember it raining a little and over night here comes the switch cane. I grabbed my                          
camera and got this shot. I remember telling a friend, "I hope this stuff sprouts up in the floor of Wal-Mart, and he was quick to                             
say, " yeah and if it does, they'll  brake it off and sell it for fishing poles and make a profit !"



File #- 2-- E. E. Property-- Top photo,  Dirt work near completion, you see how near the Wal-Mart property is to Dad's little   house, his old garage was shoved down.
 
Middle picture:  I was standing in my parents backyard looking at the building site, this scene changed daily. Always kept my camera handy. 

This was very difficult choosing just the right pictures for this story. I took so many pictures.
 
The last photo is taken form Country Club Circle, this is the back left corner of the store you see Dad's little house in the center  far in the back ground.




File #- 3-- E.E's Wal-Mart-- is FINISHED -- Again I took this picture from my parents backyard. The little house in the left  of the photo, my parents referred to as the "fruit house" not a political correct term today, I might add !!  But as we all know we  grew up in an age of innocent. Anyway this is where my Mother stored all her can goods, primarily fruit she had canned, she froze most of Dad's vegetables he raised.

This is where Dad had his work bench, he make many bird houses there. Dad was truly a man that loved nature and knew a lot about it. He made armadillo trips. One year he caught so many armadillo's he told Billy and me he'd ran out of places to bury them. 

In the winter time he made white oak baskets, all shapes and sizes. He'd cut a white oak tree, sink it in his pond to keep it from drying, then when time permitted he'd retrieve it and split it into long very thin strips for the baskets. This was Dad's last hobby. 

 
While working on this project. I've wondered  why and if anyone will be interested, but I think of it as a record of a time past. Realizing nothing stays the same. I try not to dwell on what was, but I do honor my parents for all the HARD, HARD work I now realize they put into this piece of property and my life and the life of Billy and our son Robert and Sabrina, that they loved so dearly. And a word about my Uncle Dillard. He was a craftsman and carpenter. He helped Billy and me build out home.  It grieved me to see them push his house down to make room for construction. I know how much of himself he put into his home.             

My Dad's little house was moved to a new location in Arcadia, La. and is being used by a kind lady that's rearing her young grandson and nephew. Knowing my parents, I think this would have pleased them, they never wanted to see anything, as they  would have said, "go to waste".    

LeVerne L. Kidd

Wal - Mart's New Home on the Homer Road in Minden, La.




When I took this picture I didn't want a close up of the Wal-Mart Store,  most of them all look alike anyway. So I just stood in Mother & Dad's back yard. You can see Wal-Mart in the far distant, which gives one a little different perspective . A very  different view than we had seen over the years.  We have sit in that back yard many hours. Billy and I lived next door to Mother & Dad for 5 years in a 50' x !0' trailer house. So needless to say our son called this home.  Hs first memories were this house and yard. Mother & I shelled  peas & butterbeans that Daddy raised. We also peeled buckets full of tomatoes for canning.   Mother died May 15th, 1984.  Dad passed away  Nov. 21, 1999.  I started canning a little differently. Mother did not believe in air conditioning, she believed it was bad for you. So we did a lot of our work out doors.  Anyway, I don't peal tomatoes out side anymore. I plunge them in boiling water and just slip the tomato skins right off, much easier. But then I have an air-conditioned house to work in. Mother didn't. My parents had a lot of old fashion ways. I'd say they never got out of that 30s mode. Guess you could say I'm stuck in the 50s. Do you agree that is not a bad place to be stuck in? I didn't take pictures of the new strip mall that opened back in April. This small mall is located where Dad's house once stood.

We had been through so much getting this land rezoned for commercial use my heart just wasn't into taking pictures. Maybe now  I can take a few pictures to finish out the story of this land.

This shoe store business open in Dec. and sit very close to where Mother and Dad's house once stood, more like in their front yard where the big oak trees once stood. The store faces West with the Homer Rd. to the right side, you can see part of one of the car lots across the street.

 

                                                                   THE STORY OF THE SUPPERNONGS

400-year old Mother Vine, reputed to be the oldest cultivated grapevine in the world.

Billy pick a couple of gallons of golden and purple suppernongs this morning from Gary Simolke's vineyard.  Had to research a little to educate a granddaughter... she wanted to know if suppernongs was a fruit? now really!  kids! 
Still miss my Dad suppernong vineyards, he also had the golden and purple..They make this best cobblers..NOTHING LIKE 'EM!! 
 
2008/07/mother-all-vines-gives-birth-new-wine 
 
Submitted by LeVerne Langheld Kidd, Class of 1957
 

 The picture of the little strip mall with the small tree, on the left side of the picture is where Daddy's big pear tree, garden, and barn was located. Behind the barn was Dad's price suppermong vineyard once stood. The tall trees in the background run along side of Chrislo Drive, as you can see the sun setting behind these trees. I'm facing South West. The Homer Road is to my left.

                                     The Suppernong Arbor

Here's one of Daddy's scuppernong arbors. This one was nearest our house. It had the bronze grapes on it and words can't describe how wonderfully sweet these suppernongs were. Oh how I miss them every Sept. The tin you see around the arbor was Dad's way of keep the coons and opossums out, they loved them also. He had another purple scuppernong arbor by the barn

 Suppernongs are in the muscadine grape family, and they are wonderfully SWEET. Come in two colors, golden/bronze and dark purple.  As a child I looked forward to Sept., two reasons, my birthday and  suppernong time, it's when they get ripe!  I recall one of my Dad's sister had a big arbor of suppernongs, and we'd climb up inside this thing, was huge, and sit upon the main trunk among vines and just eat  until we couldn't hold anymore. My uncle and aunt had a few pigs and these pigs would wait for us to spit the hulls out or if they were lucky drop a few of the wonderful grapes down from them to enjoy.  What fun memories.

 

 The juice from these grapes also make wonderful cobblers. Something I leaned from my Grandmother Maggie Langheld.
Here's a cute and true story. One of Dad's brother made some wine from these suppernongs. He put it in a class pitcher and stored it in the back of the fridge. he and and his wife ran to grocery shop, leaving their 4 grade school age kids home along. When they returned, these kids were turning flips and acting stranger then normal!  After much questioning, the older one said the only thing they had to drink was this pink "cool-aid" they found in the back of the fridge. 

The Wal Mart Picture Has been Placed at the very top of the page. For that shot I tried to position about where I was standing in my parents backyard when I took the first picture of the store just before the grand opening.

Now the 3rd picture of the Sonic Drive In., It's located near the corner Chris Drive and the Homer Road and a portion of Daddy's gardner ran along near this corner. His garden was on the side of this hill and he farmed it up into his 80's on that little old Farmall Cub tractor. Well once it over turned on the side of this hill, but my little ole' sweet Dad being a nimble man, bailed off and was unhurt. But what sadden him most of all, he told us, he sat there for some time trying to regain his composure and car after car would pass by going up and down Chris Drive and people would look at the tractor turned upside down and there sat my Dad on the ground near by. But not ONE person stop to inquire of his well being. That hurt my Dad more then the fall did. Oh, and he being a very patient man, use one of his tools he called a 'comealong' to return the tractor to it's upright position.

Compliments of LeVerne Langheld Kidd

THE HISTORY OF SUPPERNONG'S

       
Suppernongs are in the muscadine grape family, and they are wonderfully SWEET. Come in two colors, golden/bronze and dark purple.  As a child I looked forward to Sept., two reasons, my birthday and  suppernong time, it's when they get ripe!  I recall one of my Dad's sister had a big arbor of suppernongs, and we'd climb up inside this thing, was huge, and sit upon the main trunk among vines and just eat  until we couldn't hold anymore. My uncle and aunt had a few pigs and these pigs would wait for us to spit the hulls out or if they were lucky drop a few of the wonderful grapes down from them to enjoy.  What fun memories.

 

 The juice from these grapes also make wonderful cobblers. Something I leaned from my Grandmother Maggie Langheld.
Here's a cute and true story. One of Dad's brother made some wine from these suppernongs. He put it in a class pitcher and stored it in the back of the fridge. he and and his wife ran to grocery shop, leaving their 4 grade school age kids home along. When they returned, these kids were turning flips and acting stranger then normal !  After much questioning, the older one said the only thing they had to drink was this pink "cool-aid" they found in the back of the fridge. 

The Wal Mart Picture Has been Placed at the very top of the page. For that shot I tried to position about where I was standing in my parents backyard when I took the first picture of the store just before the grand opening.

Now the 3rd picture of the Sonic Drive In., It's located near the corner Chris Drive and the Homer Road and a portion of Daddy's gardner ran along near this corner. His garden was on the side of this hill and he farmed it up into his 80's on that little old Farmall Cub tractor. Well once it over turned on the side of this hill, but my little ole' sweet Dad being a nimble man, bailed off and was unhurt. But what sadden him most of all, he told us, he sat there for some time trying to regain his composure and car after car would pass by going up and down Chris Drive and people would look at the tractor turned upside down and there sat my Dad on the ground near by. But not ONE person stop to inquire of his well being. That hurt my Dad more then the fall did. Oh, and he being a very patient man, use one of his tools he called a 'comealong' to return the tractor to it's upright position.



 Many thanks to LeVerne Langheld Kidd for sharing this wonderful story of the land for our Minden Memories site.