Industry    

 

 

SANDERS TRACTOR CO.

 Compliments of Stanley Sanders

  I grew up here on the farm. Oldest resident on Country Club Circle.  Richard (my brother) is the next oldest.  Have always been around tractors and machinery. We raise cows, hay, and trees. I have always been interested in old tractors.  Red tractors mostly, McCormicks, Farmalls and Internationals.   They let me out of Minden High School in 1968.   Went into the army as an engineer mechanic in 1969.  Spent my time in Germany.  Got out in March of 1972.  Joined the National Guard in Dec of 1972. Retired in April of 1992. I am very proud of the young guys that I helped to grow up in the guard. They came in out of high school and got out knowing how to do something like run a bulldozer, motor grader and other pieces of heavy equipment that they would not have had a chance to operate.  Got to go to Germany, Austria, France, England, Panama, Saudia, Arabia, Iraq, and various places in Louisiana.   Started trucking in 1973.  Bought my own truck in 1976. One of these days I may get on regular. The only states that I have not been to (in the lower 48) are New Hampshire and Rhode Island. I have been to New Brunswick, Ontario, and Quebec provinces in Canada.   I have been hauling tank car culverts, flatcars for bridges, picking up damaged cars at derailments to be repaired, and large tanks for the last 15 years.    I have to give credit to my father, Douglas Sanders for teaching my brother and me a lot.  He was very good at building things.  I have had to modify the trailers to haul various loads.   I also have to give a lot of credit to my wife, Judy for putting up with me for the last 26 years.

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LOVELAND PASS

The Loveland Pass picture was on April 29, 2005.  It was 4 miles up in 2nd gear & 6 miles down in 2nd gear. I was waiting for the transmission to cool off.  My cooler was not working properly.  It got up to 320 degrees.  It is about 12,000 feet on top of the pass.  I was too tall to go through the Eisenhower Tunnel on I-70. Yes it was snowing up there.   The Lafayette picture was a 45,000 gallon tank that I moved about 5 miles to the rail yard in Lafayette, LA.  It went by rail to some where in North Dakota.

001.The first one( white tank) is in Lafayette, LA

002.The second one is on Loveland Pass.

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003.. The 60,000 gallon tank, 11' Diameter X 91' Long was loaded at Rosemount, MN. & delivered to Motiva Enterprizes, in Nashville, TN.

004.. The 30,000 gallon tanks, 9' Diameter X 66' Long,  were loaded in Tallulah, LA. & delivered to a Bio-Diesel plant in New Albany, MS.

005.. The tank is being unloaded at Warner Brothers, Ga.

 #6 is waiting to unload at Warner Robins, GA.

#7.Tanks at new home at Warner Robins AFB,GA..

  #8.The Blue dolly is being made into a steer able.  Can have a tank saddle on it or put square tubing on the turntable.

 I am putting the turntable from a track hoe on it with a hydraulic cylinder to turn it. It will be used to haul long loads

with the capability to steer around turns.

#009.The Coors tank car is well insulated.  It is loaded with beer concentrate in Golden, CO. 

About the same temp. when it gets to the brewery in Memphis, TN.  This one crashed at Marked Tree, AR. 

 I delivered it to the BNSF yard in Memphis, TN. to be repaired.

#010.The Grey Dolly is something I built.  It is a Freightliner frame and suspension with Fruehauf trailer axles.

 I can remove the saddles and put I-beam cross members on to haul long beams or railroad cars.    Below is a lumber car that derailed at Marked Tree, AR.  Delivered it to Hodge, LA. to be repaired.

  It has to be hauled on its side to reduce the height.  It is 15' tall upright.  Would be about 18' on the trailer. 

 Laying it down makes it 14' high and 15' 6" wide.  Much easier to handle width than height.

  #11.This is a lumber car that derailed at Marked Tree, AR.  Delivered it to Hodge, LA. to be repaired.

  It has to be hauled on its side to reduce the height.  It is 15' tall upright.  Would be about 18' on the trailer. 

 Laying it down makes it 14' high and 15' 6" wide.  Much easier to handle width than height.           

012.

  #13   This  description refers to pictures   014, 015, and 016.  The rear car of a passenger train.

 The one where the President would stand and wave & talk to the people. I picked it up at the KCS yard in Meridian,

MS and delivered it to Bob Young in shreveport. He is going to make it into an office for his business.

014.

015.

016.

017.Here we have loaded up to go to the tractor pull in Henderson, TX. back in April 2005.   The Front tractor is my 1955 McCormick WR9S, The 2nd tractor is Our1957 Farmall 450 Diesel, 

The third tractor is Richard's 1958 John Deere 730 LP.

The last tractor is our 1963 Farmal 560 LP.

 018.SUBMITTED IN MEMORY OF DOUG SALE

 Doug passed away back in March of this year.  He had

SALE ELECTRIC & DOUG SALE FARM EQUIPMENT

  019  Doug loved to tinker with tractors. Here he is campaigning in the Fair Parade. 

020  He out pulled everyone at the LA. State Fair with his John Deere 830 Diesel.

  021 Tommy Addison on his Farmall MV campaigning for Doug.

022.This is a 1952 McCormick W6.  I traded for it in 2004. Got for my wife on her birthday. 

She was real happy about that as you can imagine.  It has the same engine & transmission as a Farmall M. 

 Was used in the mid west more on big farms as a pulling tractor.  It was not used in row crop farming like the M.

023.Here is another view.

23a. Judy's tractor after I finished with it.

23b.

  024 Richard Sanders's 1968 International 756 Diesel.  He used it to plant and cultivate. 

We cut & bale hay with it now. Cleaned it up and painted it two years ago.

025  Richard Sanders pulling with our 1957 Farmall 450 Diesel at Henderson, TX.

026 Richard  is pulling with his 1958 John Deere 730 LP at henderson, TX.

027.The first is son, Russell Sanders on the 1957 Farmall 450 Diesel pulling at Simsboro, LA. in Nov. of 2004.

  028  

 These are my two 1955 Mccormick WR9Ss. 

 I traded 30 rolls of hay for the two tractors.  They did not look like this when I got them. The one on the left, I have finished. 

The one one the right I am still working on when I have time.

There were only 278 of these tractors built.  These two are 10 serial numbers apart.  They were bought new by a feed mill south

of Bossier City.

  When it closed down, back in the 60 s, a family in Haughton bought them. I traded the hay to them for the tractors. 

The one on the left had sat in the son's back yard for over two years. Got it home & had it running in about a hour.  The other one

had sat in the parents pasture for over 13 years with a bad motor.  I have put a power unit engine in it that Richard found at the auction

in Stuttgart,  AR.  Found rear fenders for in it in Minnesota. Have not had time to finish it.  Work keeps getting in the way.

029.This is the first 1948 Farmall Super A that came to Minden.  Mr. Bill Miller bought it new. 

 Traded it back in a year later, was not big enough.  My daddy, Douglas Sanders traded for it in 1949. 

It has been in the family ever since.  Richard, I, several cousins & my kids have learned to drive with it.

030 Tommy Addison's Formall 400

031  Tommy Addison's Farmall 400 High Clear. This tractor was built to cultivate tall crops, such as sugar cane

031a - This is our daughter, Lindsey driving our 1963 Farmall 560 LP in a parade at Magnolia, Ar. 

032b. 20007 KWKH Tractor Ride 100 + miles. We are lined up to leave the lock and dam south #4. Here we are stopped at Downtown Pelican, La. for a break.

 

032.This is Richard's 1927 Fordson.  It is waiting for someone to restore it. It was a major improvement over following a mule all day long. 

Has to be hand cranked, since it has a worm gear final drive, it can not be pull started.  

Hope you enjoy these pictures, We love to have folks look at them.

 

I moved this silo from Longview Asphalt ( owned by the Maddens) in Longview, Tx. to Prairie Contractors, in Opelousas, La.

It is 13' 8" H., 14' 10" W., 64'L. 65, 700 LBS. Gross Wt. 110,00 LBS. 91' overall length.

16' 5" overall height

Submitted by Stanley Sanders


SANITAY DAIRY

Sherry how have you been doing?  I was in Minden about three weeks ago and in one of the antique stores and I run across this. Sanitary Milk Can. I would like for you to put it on the Minden memories on the Industry Section. My Grandpaw Eugene Lumpkin was the first President of that company. I thought it would be interestiing and putting it on it. I was told probably it was  made in the 30'or 40's maybe somebody would know.My cousins Don and Joe Ratcliff saw it when I got and they haven't seen one.I got it from Second Hand Rose antique shop.
Thanks 

Jason Lumpkin

 

 Jason, this is really a treasure. We have found a lot of milk cans in antique shops but none as nice as this one. In fact, this is the only one with the name of the company that we have ever seen. It also looks to be in mint condition.

 

Standard Oil Company Main and Pine

                                             Grandpa  Lumpkin, Billy Lumpkin and Herman Ratcliff                                                                                 

                                                                   

                                                                               Photographs by Bob Grambling

                                      Don Hinton father of Donny and David Hinton, husband of Jean Rathbun, owner of Hinton's

                                     Dairy which Hinton's Dairy, supplied Saintary with all Jersey Milk. This picture was taken in

                                     Hinton's Dairy, supplied Sanitary with all Jersey Milk. This picture was taken front of his silo 

                                     which was a landmark on the Germantown Road. 

                                                                            Submitted by Greg Grambling

                             

The Hinton Barn

Photograph By Robert "Bob" Grambling

Submitted by Greg Grambling

Bet that is Donnie Hinton standing in the barn door.

Jersey cattle' pasture of R. D. Hinton Minden, Louisiana

Photograph by Bob Grambling

Submitted by Greg Grambling

Field of Sheep, photo by Bob Grambling

May have been photographed on a farm out Highway 80 toward Shreveport.  Maybe someone can remember who had sheep on Hwy 80 West.

Submitted by Greg Grambling

Submitted by Quade Studio, 513 Main Street, Minden, La. 71055

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If anyone is able to identify these employees, please e-mail me at MindenMemories@AOL.Com or write Sherry Gritzbaugh, 4507 Verone St., Bellaire, Texas 77401

Photo compliments of Donald Lee Gardner and/or Dr. Charles Hennigan

Mr. Culbertson was one of the organizer's of Sanitary Dairy and he rode the train to St. Louis to pick up the first milk truck. The design had no doors, so that was a mighty cold trip from St. Louis back to Minden in February about 1946 or 1947. When SD    began marketing homogenized milk, his son, Sammy's picture was used in the ad according to his sister Linda.                             

Clement - Braswell Industries, Photographed by Robert Grambling, Sunmitted by Greg Grambling

In the Braswell employees picture, the man on the far right in glasses is my
uncle, J. B. Braswell, Sr., one of the owners.  I'm sure I knew some of the
others, but can't place them now.  It's been too long.

Identified by Judianne Braswell Myers


Wow, I've never seen the picture with the Management group before. My Dad Connie Cook was their Sales Manager when we lived in Minden ('56 - '61. He's squatting on the left in 2nd picture.

Tanker Cook
Tanker Cook
E.S Richardson & Minden Jr. High
'56 - '60 in Minden

Photographed by Robert Grambling.  Submitted by Greg Grambling

Photo by Robert Grambling, Submitted by Greg Grambling

If you are able to identify any of the men in these pictures e-mail MindenMemories@AOL.COM

and mention the title under the picture. We would also appreciate knowing the name of the equipment they are working on & what they are doing.

First Batch- Picture #1.

Clement Braswell Industries

Photo by Robert Grambling, Submitted by Greg Grambling

One Man Working - Picture #2.

Clement Braswell Industries

Photo by Robert Grambling, Submitted by Greg Grambling

Three Men Working - Picture #3.

Clement Braswell, Photo by Robert Grambling, submitted by Greg Grambling

Two Men Working Picture #4.

Clement Braswell, photo by Robert Grambling, submitted by Greg Grambling

Second Batch,  Picture #5.

Photo by Robert Grambling, Submitted by Greg Grambling

If you can identify any of these pictures e-mail MindenMemories & reference the batch # and title under the pictures.

Celement Braswell  Picture #6, Photo by Robert Braswell, Submitted by Greg Grambling

Clement Braswell - Picture #7, Is this Charles Cranford

Photo by Robert Grambling, Submitted by Greg Grambling

CLEMENT BRASWELL PICTURE #7 -  Correction

The man standing at the piece of machinery is my father, HughW. Cranford,
not Charles Cranfod. Hugh was the oldest brother of Charles.

If I can be of any further assistance please let me know,

      With kindest regards,
      Elizabeth Cranford Gregenheimer

Clement Braswell, Picture #8, Three Men Working

Photo by Robert "Bob" Grambling, Submitted by Greg G

Clement Braswell Picture #9, Photo by Robert "Bob" Grambling, Submitted by Greg Grambling

If you recognize any of the men in the pictures e-mail MindenMemories@AOl.COM,

We would also appreciate knowing what their job description was.

Picture #10, Clement Braswell Submitted by Greg Grambling, Photo by Robert Grambling

Picture #11 Clement Braswell, Photo by Bob Grambling, Submitted by Greg Grambling

CLEMENT EMPLOYEES PICTURE #11

-  
The man on the back row (all of guys
are standing)  on the left side (with dard colored shirt) is W. E. "Dave Wilson.
The man on the farright in the glasses is J. B. Braswell, Sr., one of the owners.

Identified by Judianne Braswell Meyers, niece of J. B. Braswell, Sr. and
Elizabeth C. Gegenheimer, grandaughter of W. E. "Dave" Wilson, daughter
of Pat and Hugh Cranford.

Picture #12 Clement Braswell, Photo by Bob Grambling, Submitted by Greg Grambling

If you can identify the men and machinery in the above pictures, please e-mail us at MindenMemories@AOL.COM

Job Descriptions of the men would also be appreciated.

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COTTON COMPRESS

       Minden has a good trade. They use the tap railroad to ship cotton from Minden to Shreveport. The tap railroad was completed Oct. 27, 1885.

       The great Cotton Compress was an important industry to Minden. No sooner was it than the old town, which lagged for a time, resumed her wonted activity. In August, 1888 Crow Brothers sent in the first bale of cotton to Minden. It weighed 440 pounds, and by McKenzie and 13 1/2 cents per pound.

   PA2472 Minden, Louisiana COTTON COMPRESS F-240 Cotton Compress

                                                     P2493  (262) Minden, La. Cotton Compress on Sibley Road after cycone 1933 (F=134)

               Compliments of Archives & Special Collections La. State University - Shreveport One-university Place, Shreveport, La. 71115-2399

                                                                       P2473 MINDEN COTTON OIL AND ICE COMPANY

This is the gin located on the other side of the railroad tracks just West of downtown, on the South Side of the Street. It was a

Cotton Gin and Cotton Seed Oil Plant. It was Gin and Cotton Seed Oil Plant inside the City Limit by the railroad tracks. 
GG

He is working at the cotton gin. Does anyone know his name. If so e-mail us at MindenMemories@AOL.COM

Photo by Bob Grambling

         (See the article under Minden Industries ) Compliments of Archives and Special Collections, La. State Univ. - Shreveport, La. 71115-23299.

                                           PA2815 MINDEN COTTON OIL & ICE COMPANY,  LTD MULE DRAWN MODEL T TRUCK CA 1925

                                                      

                                                                                                    Standard Oil - Main and Pine

                                                                               

                                                                               Compliments of Archives and Special Collections La. State University - Shreveport

                                                                                        One University Place, Shreveport, la. 71115-2399

                                                                           P2514 MINDEN ICE PLANT   F-203 Photographer Cockrell Studio,  Pine Street, Minden, La.

The ice plant was owned by a Mr. Benefield.  He may have had a son called Buster who became a Baptist preacher.

Compliments of Archives and Special Collections La. State University - Shreveport

One University Place, Shreveport, la. 71115-2399

 

                                                                                    PA2469 MINDEN, LA. COTTON COMPRESS WAREHOUSE INTERIOR F-239

Compliments of Archives & Special Collections - LSU-Shreveport, One University Place, Shreveport, La. 711155-2399

P2494 SIBLEY ROAD COTTON GIN

  After the 1933 Storm

Further in the background, are the L&A Shops. The tornado killed at least 28 people and injured over

four hundred. It did more than a million dollars in damages.  

                       

COCA  COLA BOTTLING CO.

PA2576 MINDEN BOTTLING WORKS, FIRST PLANT 1901 1901 f-153

Compliments of Archives and Special Collections LSU, Shreveport; One University Place, Shreveport, La. 71115-2399

Bottling plant built in 1914.  In use thru 1925.  This plant operated the Grist Mill and Wood Yard thru 1919.  An Excelsior Manufacturing Plant was added in rear in 1915 and was operated thru 1919.

RPA2815 Hauling Logs

    

Compliments of La. State University Archives & Special Collections

One University Place, Shreveport, La. 71115-2399

PA2953  MINDEN, LA. LOGGING OPERATION 1904 (f301)- (f307) LUMBERING

Compliments of La. State University Archives & Special Collections

One University Place, Shreveport, La. 71115-2399

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PA 2792  Minden Lumber Company burned 1918

ca 1916 F-165

Compliments of La. State University - Shreveport Archives & Special Collections

One University Place, Shreveport, La. 71115-2399

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PA2710 Minden, La. Lumber Mill - March 3, 1965

Compliments of Archives & Special Collections Louisiana State University

One University Place, Shreveport, La. 71115-2399

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PA2655   262 Minden Lumber Co. Saw Mill, Minden, La. 

F-210 Photographer: E.C. Kropp Co., postcards Lumbering

Compliments of Louisiana State University - Shreveport Archives & Special Collections - Shreveport

One University Place, Shreveport, La. 71115 - 2399

 

P2650 Minden, La. Lumber Yard 813 Broadway Formerly liverly yard ca 1940 1940 F-254

Compliments of Archives and Special Collections; LSU-Shreveport, One University Place, Shreveport, La. 71115-2399

 

PA674 THE RAILROAD WAS AN IMPORTANT INDUSTRY TO MINDEN

December 30, 1928

"The Shreveporter" train in Minden, Louisiana on its maiden trip

Compliments of Archives and Special Collections; LSU-Shreveport, One University Place, Shreveport, La. 71115-2399 Photo by Grabill

WINCH LIFT

Winch Lift

Submitted by Nola Stonecipher Ellington

The picture of Wench Life isn't part of the shell plant.  It used to be where the new civic center is.  When Wench Lift closed daddy bought some of the equipment and had a welding shop where Wench Lift had been.  I don't remember the year he opened his shop there.  He made a lot of the wrought iron trim on different houses around Minden.  The cemetery out on the Shreveport road, I think it's Johnny Horton buried there ahd a big wrought iron entrance.  He built that.  I remember he went out to see it after they installed it and took me with him.  He showed me the grave with the guitar on it. Nola Ellington